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Old 06-02-2019, 08:56 AM
Bart Bart is offline
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Default Transporting heavy machinery over lawn

Hi guys
I have a bit of an issue.
I need to move an old second hand CNC mill with a forklift to my back garage but I have a back yard/lawn. Its about 11 meters 36 feet from a concrete path to my back garage, back garage has a concrete floor.
Hiring steel road plates to lay on the lawn is around $2500 for a few days which is super expensive.
What other alternatives have people used other than road plates. I was thinking timber road plate, ply wood or similar used in construction which are pretty strong but don't know if they're strong enough. I don't mind if they get damaged as long as the forklift doesn't sink while carrying the CNC. The forklift and CNC together is about 10 tonn.
Any suggestions would be great
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:21 AM
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mr.c mr.c is offline
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Hire a tilt-bed wrecker to move the machine or a dually tired forklift. I have two forklifts. One is a big dually tired and the other is warehouse type. The warehouse forklift is useless on anything but concrete or hard pavement. It is buried the moment it leaves a hard surface. I don't think that plywood would stand a chance.
I use the dually tired forklift all over my property. I have buried it a few times, however.
Put the machine on the wrecker with the forklift on hard ground. Slide it off into your shop. Then load your forklift onto the wrecker and move it back to the shop. Or put both on the wrecker and place the forklift into the shop first.
Trust me on this. Retrieving a buried forklift will not be the highlight of your day. It will be memorable however.
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:03 AM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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Having buried my hard tired forklift more than once, I support the suggestion.


The slideback should be less expensive than renting a rubber tired forklift.
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:26 AM
Stevemo Stevemo is offline
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A local construction company may have a loader with forks.
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Old 06-02-2019, 12:30 PM
blue62 blue62 is offline
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Do a internet search for swamp mats.
My experience with them has been positive.
They are light weight you can pick they up and move them by hand.
you can carry them in the back of a pickup truck.
they support heavy weight over soft condition.
I have used them on wet boggy grass and soil to move mini excavators, vactor trucks, dump trucks, dozers.
used them a lot in the work place. we always rented them. price was reasonable.
they should work well for your needs
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Old 06-02-2019, 12:35 PM
Reno Reno is offline
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I have used short lengths of 2" pipe as rollers to move heavy equipment. Theoretically it would only take three sheets of strong plywood, but a longer run speeds the process. One sheet under the machine and the others laid out as the track, or hopscotched across the lawn. The main concern is to control the momentum and direction so the machine stays on track. Also keep the center of gravity as low as possible to avoid tipping.
Good luck.
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Old 06-02-2019, 01:58 PM
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Superleggera Superleggera is offline
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Call around to the industrial rental places and ask for a drop deck trailer. Basically a hydraulic actuated trailer deck that can be lowered flat onto the ground. Last one I rented to move a large CNC mill and my big lathe was $115/half day or $155 for 24 hours. Two trips for the big castings and another two trips for all my big rolling tool chests. Two person operation to move it all.

Might be just as easy to put the CNC mill onto an above style trailer (stabilized load and secured) with your forklift and then use your truck to move it. Unload with your forklift. It will probably take you longer to drive to get and return the trailer itself than in the actual moving.
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Old 06-02-2019, 02:31 PM
Jaroslav Jaroslav is offline
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Send photo machines and its bases. For idea.
It is possible to use 4 boards and move the machine on rollers or pipes or special moving bogies. When the board ends, you give another. 4 planks should be enough across the field. If it is uphill, you can use a winch or something similar to secure. If this is the case you can move the machine to all sides. If the machine is made of steel, it can be handled as it is. If the machine is made of concrete, you must use moving bogies.
The big crane won't reach there? Or are you just transporting on your land?

Dsc02768.jpg

DSC07508.jpg
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Old 06-02-2019, 08:51 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Carey and Mark are both offering good advice. Never rented swamp mats but have used similar gear as well and agree there as well. Using a warehouse (hard tired) forklift off pavement is a bad idea. Check the various prices and availability to see what works.

One other option for consideration- All my stone work is heavy, little ones are around 1000lbs and others ranging up to 15 tons (so far) per piece. The biggest stones are done outside the studio for a few reasons. To do that, renting a mobile 50 ton crane usually costs around $500 rollout plus 1 HR minimum and a small fuel surcharge. I plan on $650 +/- per lift for those times. With a flatbed staying on paved surface and proper Crane placement, moving a 15 ton stone approx 50 ft in one lift is no problem.

Whatever you do, ask whomever you hire about the surfaces you expect them to cross. Some have no problems leaving a paved surface. Some are less agreeable, especially with a load greater than 5 tons or vehicle over 26k gvw. Better to know that before they arrive on site.
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Old 06-02-2019, 09:51 PM
Bart Bart is offline
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Great advice guys
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=1...v1UOqDSV4P9klM
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Last edited by Bart; 06-02-2019 at 10:20 PM.
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