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  #21  
Old 10-04-2017, 04:30 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex_A_Lott View Post
A chef,a sculptor , metalman, and now a clown....
I did have a fellow tell me he liked Ford springs from before the War for repurposing, but he was using them to make hatchets, using blacksmithing techniques. Good Luck
Stop by sometime, Barry. I'll use the springs off of one side and you can have the springs from the other side...

Seriously, I was thinking the same thing as you posted about using older springs so thought I would ask. Lots of stories floating around.
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  #22  
Old 10-10-2017, 01:15 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default Another use for the spring steel slapper

P1040406 copy.jpg
When making difficult off-set bends in the brake, sometimes the 20ga steel needs more help going into place...

P1040409 copy.jpg
The slapper spreads out the force so the dead-blow hammer makes the sheet move with few marks.

P1040415 copy.jpg
When clamping the part down to make another offset, the slapper again spreads out the clamping force, avoiding marks.

P1040424 copy.jpg
Still a ways to go, but a pretty good start on a rocker panel that bows out and curves under at the same time, with added "artwork" coming along next.
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  #23  
Old 10-10-2017, 10:38 AM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Kent
Thanks for all the examples and processes.
Steve
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  #24  
Old 10-10-2017, 10:59 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default Taking down large high spots - no marks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hamilton View Post
Kent
Thanks for all the examples and processes.
Steve
You are very welcome, Steve.

///////////////////

For large high spots on panels with a fair bit of crown ....
P1020530 copy.jpg
it's nice to be able to move some metal without leaving marks.

Note that the grip is halfway up the hammer handle.
And the slapper is held firmly against the panel.
Swat once and see.
Swat again for more movement. Easy does it.

(car: Alfa Boano, one-off for Turin Auto Show, 1957.
winner 1st in Class, Pebble, 2017.
Work in this photo being done at Fast Cars, SoCal.)
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2017, 11:30 PM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
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Thanks Kent as well for taking the time to post this and other stuff on the forum. I appreciate it. I made some leaf spring slappers before I got your booklet "The Forming Stump, Slappers, Spoon and Spike" and was surprised how close the ones I made were to your design. Made me feel like I was on the right path (or at least in the right direction).
Do you have any recommendations on what leaf springs would make good tools. Stuff that is obtainable in junkyards. I found that Ford truck leaf springs seem to be higher quality stuff than Chevy/GMC (later model late 90's early 2000's) Also can I assume the thinner the spring the better quality steel?
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  #26  
Old 10-11-2017, 02:31 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
Thanks Kent as well for taking the time to post this and other stuff on the forum. I appreciate it. I made some leaf spring slappers before I got your booklet "The Forming Stump, Slappers, Spoon and Spike" and was surprised how close the ones I made were to your design. Made me feel like I was on the right path (or at least in the right direction).
Do you have any recommendations on what leaf springs would make good tools. Stuff that is obtainable in junkyards. I found that Ford truck leaf springs seem to be higher quality stuff than Chevy/GMC (later model late 90's early 2000's) Also can I assume the thinner the spring the better quality steel?
Glad to help, Chris. You are very welcome.

I think any auto/truck suspension leaf spring with the right dimensions is the best way to go, however you can find them. Cheap, available, and more metallurgy than you will need for whacking metal.

Now, for smithing out "edged tools" .... that is a whole 'nother (side-trackin') topic.
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  #27  
Old 10-12-2017, 06:08 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default steel slapper leveling the aluminum gas weld

Dayt Cob CL copy.jpg
This is the standard grip to have on the steel slapper, (from "metalmen" / craftsmen going back to 1919 - Frank Cufaude, Jim Taylor, Walt Borland, Gene Halvorson ...)
Hand is firm on handle, index finger extended onto back of striking face, for control/accuracy. The slapper will acquire a shiny spot from that steady finger.

Alternate grip, for a different body position - when your body is lower than the panel.
Dayt Koop CL copy.jpg

Whackity-bambambam until the HAZ is level, distortion and stress gone, softness back to hard, and weld bead tamed enough for the file.

Thus:
Dayt coop CL copy.jpg
and
RSK copy.jpg
etcetera
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Last edited by crystallographic; 10-13-2017 at 10:19 AM.
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  #28  
Old 10-13-2017, 09:41 AM
blue62 blue62 is offline
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Kent
You always do great write ups.
Thanks I learn something from everything you write.
But my God your collection of photos is amazing.
Thanks for posting some of them.
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  #29  
Old 10-15-2017, 09:10 AM
sblack sblack is offline
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In England, "slapper" is a derogatory slang term for a vulgar or immoral woman! So be careful where and how you use the term.
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Last edited by sblack; 10-15-2017 at 09:12 AM.
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  #30  
Old 10-15-2017, 11:26 AM
Richard Lennard Richard Lennard is offline
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Youre correct, be careful how you use the term!!
However their treatment is the same!!
Tee hee, please remove if inappropriate.
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