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  #1  
Old 07-20-2020, 08:20 AM
ojh ojh is offline
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Default How to form 'X' bead?

How would you make this 'X' in the gastank endcap?
132.jpg

Thanks, Oj
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Old 07-20-2020, 09:13 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
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Default X

I would use a router or chisel to cut the grooves in a wooden hammer form. Then pound it in with a rounded punch. You could also form the perimeter flange on the same hammer form. One of many ways.
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Old 07-20-2020, 09:23 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by ojh View Post
How would you make this 'X' in the gastank endcap?
Attachment 56874

Thanks, Oj

X-beads take some effort, very unlike using a leaf brake to criss-cross bend a tailgate panel.


Guessing yer metal is terne plate? (lead-coated steel)
These tank ends were likely press-formed using nice male-female steel dies.

Getting some round bar to match yer profile, cutting to fit and laying the three pcs in the gullets and tacking one side, flipping and welding, flipping again and welding, then smacking back to straight end level fit - gets you the male X "die" which is then skip welded onto some 1/4" plate.

Then you can rig the "Pullmax" nibbler for an upper die to close down over your terne material +X die combined - and a lower die to support/guide the plate. Then stroke that enough times to draw fully down over your X die.


Or set up to flow form the panel down over the X die, on the workbenchbench.


Or, cast up a lead/epoxy female die in a steel bolster (need both ends for that tank?) and then use about 15 tons to smoosh your panels.... 22ga DDQ or EDQ will work for end panels on that size suitcase.


Or machine some brass round bars to lay accurately on a blank surface, rivet then on and solder all around to simulate the artwork.


That catfish can be skinned in different ways.
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Old 07-20-2020, 11:49 AM
ojh ojh is offline
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I tried the form flow, considered getting different tooling from Kent to see if I get better results. It took forever to get 1 panel made and it wasn't finished. I've made an upper die for the Trumpf and trying to figure how to clamp and align it all together to do it in a machine.
134.jpg
I'd like to do 3 sets of them.
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Old 07-20-2020, 01:01 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by ojh View Post
I tried the form flow, considered getting different tooling from Kent to see if I get better results. It took forever to get 1 panel made and it wasn't finished. I've made an upper die for the Trumpf and trying to figure how to clamp and align it all together to do it in a machine.
Attachment 56875
I'd like to do 3 sets of them.

OJ,
Just add the top layer with the X opening, clamp tight and chase the bead down with the rivet gun.
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Old 07-20-2020, 02:00 PM
ojh ojh is offline
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Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
OJ,
Just add the top layer with the X opening, clamp tight and chase the bead down with the rivet gun.
Tried it like that, didn't have 'top layer', I had C clamped the perimeter and 11ga strapping between clamps and form, they weren't very close to the X opening. I was wondering if the metal was too much area to stretch from and it needed clamping right at the edge of the X opening.
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Old 07-20-2020, 05:08 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojh View Post
Tried it like that, didn't have 'top layer', I had C clamped the perimeter and 11ga strapping between clamps and form, they weren't very close to the X opening. I was wondering if the metal was too much area to stretch from and it needed clamping right at the edge of the X opening.

OJ,
"Close to halfway" ain't enuf for a serious grade on this metal whacking method.
Seriously, Bub....



Bite the $%@##&* bullet ... !

Make the top half, Clamp/BOLT it TIGHT, and bonk in the bead. (bolting is much less clamp-slippy when rattling in these beads )

You can do this - Times Six Each, for 3 sets - If you maintain the rigors.


If you need a better schnooble - let me know the bead radius ... and if you have a spare rivet set on hand to modify ... ?
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Old 07-21-2020, 08:38 AM
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Groan...
I guess I knew and just needed the telling.
Where do you get this 'terne'? I was going to do a heavy coat of ospho.
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Old 07-21-2020, 09:50 AM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
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Terne is the material. Lead plated steel sheet.
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Old 07-21-2020, 12:53 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Terne is the material. Lead plated steel sheet.

Righty-o, Chris ...


But the stuff is near-impossible to locate these past years.
I had to make a replacement 1914 roadster tank using my own supply of terne several years ago. Now I'd probably have to make repro tanks from Gal-X-C and that is darn sensitive to soldering heats - get it right or face the Black Patch of "lost time" scrubbing and tinning it back to bright ...!


Ron Naida probably has the best idea - make terne yourself - and he made a post here on his whole process of solder-coating enough sheet for a tank he built - as original.

A Primo Post !!!
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