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  #51  
Old 12-04-2017, 08:50 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Jim Tomczyk View Post
Thanks Kent for the detailed explanation and reply (and Jerry /Mike /AllyBill for your inputs)
Answers the questions or should I say blanks I had in my head - especially as very much a " learner " & hadn't heard of dilution - appreciate this is more of a problem if welding new to old materials - does this still also apply though if the same material is used as filler? - assuming new to new and filler is an offcut of the new.

Not looking for a shortcut - as my personal goal with gas welding is as you say -just interested in the flexibility of the different processes and where they might crossover if at all.
Hi Jim,
I cannot think of a time when using the same/nearly-same filler as material being welded would lead to a cracking/failure problem, so am thinking dilution is not the problem, in these cases ...? - no matter the welding method.

For decades welders used parent metal strips to weld with (much before tig' arrival - Dec. 1942).
Distinct fillers came about during the 1930's, along with the growth in numbers of alloys of aluminum, 4130, stainless, magnesium...etc.

Incomplete fusion can be a problem, with any welding method, and tig is not above it all and seems also to have its share of cold-shut joints and insufficient filler deposition. (Note: NHRA requires drilled holes in welds to demonstrate depth of penetration on tig-welded roll bars/cages on those race cars.)

Personally, I think careful scrutiny of failed welds is a priority in establishing any/all aspects contributing to failures, even adding third and fourth sets of eyes/minds ....

(Caveat: Any number of competing opinions can and do arise as pertaining to welding questions/difficulties/methods/techniques/styles/preferences... etc etc, and so one clear choice/path/method/procedure may of its own volition, spontaneously diss i p a t e.)
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  #52  
Old 12-05-2017, 05:42 AM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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If welds are failing in new material I'd say it's a heat issue. Sounds to me like, no matter which method is being used to glue the parts together, it all needs to be hotter. Take an extra minute to heat-soak a wider area before starting and see if that solves things.

Will
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  #53  
Old 12-07-2017, 08:04 AM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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Been messing in the workshop today. When l learned to weld this was an essential qualification. Good fun too. We used to compete to see who could do the neatest one. Not as tidy as l used to be but not bad considering it's 30 years since l tried it.

1512651684534765162421.jpg
Will
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Last edited by Steve Hamilton; 12-08-2017 at 03:06 PM.
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  #54  
Old 12-08-2017, 11:49 AM
CaptonZap CaptonZap is offline
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TIG, I take it?
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  #55  
Old 12-08-2017, 03:42 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by AllyBill View Post
Been messing in the workshop today. When l learned to weld this was an essential qualification. Good fun too. We used to compete to see who could do the neatest one. Not as tidy as l used to be but not bad considering it's 30 years since l tried it.

Attachment 44438
Will
Yeh, but I can afford to buy a new can.

Safely tigging on the thick ends I see.
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  #56  
Old 12-08-2017, 05:34 PM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
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I always learn something when reading your posts Kent. Thank you.
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  #57  
Old 12-08-2017, 05:40 PM
mastuart mastuart is offline
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Cut that pop can down the middle and but weld it back together. Then I will be more impressed. Not that I can do any better.
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