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  #11  
Old 12-03-2018, 06:56 PM
steve.murphy steve.murphy is offline
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You may have seen this already: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDgE47M73CE
About halfway they talk about how he builds the buck .
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  #12  
Old 12-03-2018, 07:43 PM
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Kerry Pinkerton Kerry Pinkerton is offline
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We have a member here, Brent Click, that has a new state-of-the-art scanner and the cad software to go with it. He doesn't visit often but is active on Facebook. I bet there is a FB scanning group you could join and ask for who does what. I'll be glad to ask Brent if he has any contacts on the west coast.

That said, you're going to need to get access to a car and expect you'll need it to be somewhat local because you're going to want to participate in the stretching process so I expect you'll want to use someone local.

My limited experience is that waterjet does a nicer and faster job than CNC routers. One of the companies I did some sculpture work with up in Indianapolis was primarily a water jet company with the latest and greatest in technology. In fact, they were beta testing a new FloJet machine during the months I was there. Obviously, the machine cuts faster in thinner and softer material and in wood it just flies!
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2018, 08:34 PM
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RockHillWill RockHillWill is offline
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Good evening Joel. Just some random thoughts:

A free standing egg crate buck can be made in sections that bolt together. When bolted together it can be used as a 'dummy' body for making body and chassis mounting brackets. If you look at the links that I made above you can note that the components are made in an interlocking manner. I used glue to hold them together because I wanted to be able to use them as a type of 'hammer form' as I am not yet a very skilled metal shaper. If you chose to bolt or screw them together, they could be disassembled for storage.

By using the water jet to cut, if can get the water jet guy to tell you when he has installed a new nozzle, you do not have to allow for clearances when drawing the parts. I used 5/8" thick Baltic Birch plywood and the fit together so well that often I had to tap them into place. Buck that I n=made over ten years ago have been used often for miscellaneous classes, etc.
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  #14  
Old 12-05-2018, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry Pinkerton View Post
My limited experience is that waterjet does a nicer and faster job than CNC routers. One of the companies I did some sculpture work with up in Indianapolis was primarily a water jet company with the latest and greatest in technology. In fact, they were beta testing a new FloJet machine during the months I was there. Obviously, the machine cuts faster in thinner and softer material and in wood it just flies!
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockHillWill View Post
Good evening Joel. Just some random thoughts:

A free standing egg crate buck can be made in sections that bolt together. When bolted together it can be used as a 'dummy' body for making body and chassis mounting brackets. If you look at the links that I made above you can note that the components are made in an interlocking manner. I used glue to hold them together because I wanted to be able to use them as a type of 'hammer form' as I am not yet a very skilled metal shaper. If you chose to bolt or screw them together, they could be disassembled for storage.

By using the water jet to cut, if can get the water jet guy to tell you when he has installed a new nozzle, you do not have to allow for clearances when drawing the parts. I used 5/8" thick Baltic Birch plywood and the fit together so well that often I had to tap them into place. Buck that I n=made over ten years ago have been used often for miscellaneous classes, etc.
Thanks for the information!

Does anyone have experience with the combination of MDF and CNC Laser? I'm thinking of using MDF because of cost (a whole car buck uses lots of sheets times high cost per sheet equals $BIG BUCKS$). One of the cons of MDF is it doesn't do well with water. But if MDF cuts well with laser then that might be a winning combination.
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  #15  
Old 12-05-2018, 05:04 PM
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RockHillWill RockHillWill is offline
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It took me a while to come to the conclusion that if you are going to have a useable, lasting wooden egg crate buck, cheap will rule that out. I tried several kinds of plywood and none of it turned out to work well for me. It split, drew moisture, split when I hit on it with a hammer, etc. Water from the water jet leaves a mild surface stain that rubs right off, but water has no effect on it that I have seen to date, and some of my Model A bucks are 14 years old
When I was in racing, one of the Ford factory chassis builders and parts suppliers had a sign at his sales counter that said "speed costs money, how fast do you want to go". It was, and still Is, sound logic. You will get what you pay for.

As always, this is just an opinion from an old guy!
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  #16  
Old 12-09-2018, 11:41 AM
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I built a square tube frame just smaller than the outside surface. (rigid and light weight) Then I covered it with 1/4" baltic birch plywood (very stable and stiff)
Then I cut away the inside surface of my 1/4" baltic birch buck stations and glued them to the plywood box using small wood blocks as reenforcement. Finally I coated the whole thing with polyurethane floor finish. This made a light and stable buck for most of my car.

Any highly sculpted area (around the headlights etc.) I ended up building up solid with MDF (1/2" and 1/4" layers) and filing and smoothing with pattern makers filler and coating with epoxy. I bolted this final piece to the steel frame. It only describes the first 8" of my car but weighs more than the rest of my buck.

Good luck. This is my third try and I'm not sure I should not have built it over the chassis.
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  #17  
Old 12-09-2018, 02:00 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockHillWill View Post
It took me a while to come to the conclusion that if you are going to have a useable, lasting wooden egg crate buck, cheap will rule that out. I tried several kinds of plywood and none of it turned out to work well for me. It split, drew moisture, split when I hit on it with a hammer, etc. Water from the water jet leaves a mild surface stain that rubs right off, but water has no effect on it that I have seen to date, and some of my Model A bucks are 14 years old
When I was in racing, one of the Ford factory chassis builders and parts suppliers had a sign at his sales counter that said "speed costs money, how fast do you want to go". It was, and still Is, sound logic. You will get what you pay for.

As always, this is just an opinion from an old guy!
Will: thanks for the straight shooting feedback. I do understand your point and appreciate you have a lot more experience with station bucks than I. So I am really listening and acting on your input. My dilemma is that I'm basically making a one time use buck. I'm trying to balance the investment in cost with the needed serviceability to get a good outcome. In other words, I'm not trying to be cheap but on the other hand don't want to over engineer it either.
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  #18  
Old 12-09-2018, 02:15 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vroom View Post
I built a square tube frame just smaller than the outside surface. (rigid and light weight) Then I covered it with 1/4" baltic birch plywood (very stable and stiff)
Then I cut away the inside surface of my 1/4" baltic birch buck stations and glued them to the plywood box using small wood blocks as reenforcement. Finally I coated the whole thing with polyurethane floor finish. This made a light and stable buck for most of my car.

Any highly sculpted area (around the headlights etc.) I ended up building up solid with MDF (1/2" and 1/4" layers) and filing and smoothing with pattern makers filler and coating with epoxy. I bolted this final piece to the steel frame. It only describes the first 8" of my car but weighs more than the rest of my buck.

Good luck. This is my third try and I'm not sure I should not have built it over the chassis.
Tim: thanks for sharing. Do you have pictures you can post? For the solid buck pieces, are you using it as a hammer form?

I ask because my plan right now is to have solid areas on my buck for front and rear grill openings, headlight openings, hood vents, and an indented body line that runs length of the hood. I plan to use these solid areas as hammer forms such that I get accurate, symmetrically placed openings.

I'm having these hammer form areas designed into the buck stations and will have CNC instructions such that they can be formed/shaped on a CNC router.

Why did you go with 1/4" buck stations? Are they stable enough to give you accurate feedback on panel fit?
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  #19  
Old 12-11-2018, 11:02 AM
vroom vroom is offline
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I don't have many fotos. In the first one you can see where the 1/4" stations are doubled where the buck comes apart. The wire is for clipping partial panels to when forming The second foto shows the built up stations before I filled them with model makers filler and sanded them smooth for use as a hammer buck.

Well I you can see some fotos when I can figure out how to post them.
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  #20  
Old 12-11-2018, 01:57 PM
vroom vroom is offline
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Here are the fotos:
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 1044.pdf (35.1 KB, 26 views)
File Type: pdf 1640.pdf (23.3 KB, 18 views)
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