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  #51  
Old 06-14-2018, 10:49 AM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Originally Posted by Kerry Pinkerton View Post
I'm a bit confused about the gears and chain? I'm involved in the GMC motorhome cult and they used the Olds Toronado (caddy Eldorodo) TH325 transmission which was basically a TH400 turned 180 degrees. They connected the engine and tranny via a chain. The chain itself is about 1 1/2 to 2" wide if I recall from having mine out. The pan in the photos doesn't look deep enough for two gears and the chain?



Of course, technology has progressed a bit since the early 70's. I was just thinking you'd need a pretty stout chain to handle that much power?


Can you elaborate on the differential? The napkin sketch just shows a chain. I'm assuming it somehow connects to a limited slip differential type of thinge that the half shaft axles bolt to?
Kerry: we decided to do gears only and NOT include a chain in the transfer case. This was because the transmission is close enough to the crankshaft that the gear size was reasonable. Using gears only is simpler and minimizes the the thickness of the transfer case. This design change is one of those things you can only work out with a mockup using real parts. If the distance between engine crank and trans was another inch or two, a chain would have been required.

The differential center section is limited slip unit used in a 2015+ Mustang IRS. Instead of using a pinion gear and hypoid ring gear, we'll be using two helical/angle cut gears. The smaller gear mounts on the transmission main/output shaft and the larger mounts on the differential where the ring gear normally mounts. I'm targeting a 3.40 final drive ratio so that will dictate the size of these gears. We'll make a case to house differential unit that will mate up and attach to the output housing on the transmission. There's stub axles that connect the differential to the CVs, etc.

I'll show this in pictures once we start building that part. We're waiting for the output housing and transmission main/output shaft to arrive in order to start on that area.
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  #52  
Old 06-21-2018, 10:33 AM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Miura chassis construction underway

As a reminder, I decided to use an all aluminum monocoque chassis from Strickland Racing for the Miura. I’m very excited about this chassis for the Miura as to me it represents a big technological advancement. The original Miura chassis was known to exhibit some flex and was prone to metal worm attacks over time. The Strickland chassis should be much lighter weight, more rigid, and shouldn’t deteriorate over time given the use of “marine grade” aluminum. In addition, Charley’s highly automated approach to chassis construction keeps the cost in the reasonable range.

A small part of the car sizing answer was in consideration for chassis table fixture mounting. By adding .5% on 105% giving the 105.5% this resulted in good alignment to the chassis table such that mounting holes aligned to fixture holes. The chassis was fully modeled with a CAD application and then the CNC cutting instructions are generated from the model. Chassis parts are made from 5052 aluminum and are cut from ¼” sheet on a 3 axis CNC router. I’m told the accuracy of the CNC cut chassis parts is incredible and they fit to one another easily by hand.

Some chassis parts after cutting and removal from sheet.





Sheet on CNC cutting table after the cut pieces have been removed. With careful placement on the sheet, there’s very little waste after cutting.



The chassis is assembled on a precision chassis table. The chassis members are secured to the table during assembly to ensure alignment for a straight and true chassis. Tabs and slots are used to accurately index the chassis members to one another.





After trial fitting to ensure fitment, the chassis members are fastened together with special metal bonding epoxy glue. As you can see in these pictures, the chassis is quickly taking shape.

I’d like to thank Charley Strickland for providing these progress photos. I know it provides much better insight for you as to how something is made when you can see it in the various stages of construction.
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  #53  
Old 06-21-2018, 11:54 AM
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Kerry Pinkerton Kerry Pinkerton is offline
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Joel, do I understand that the chassis is put together with adhesives????


If so, I'd be interested in what they use. I have some of the 3M panel bonding stuff and the special gun that mixes the two parts as it squeezes out but I don't think I'd trust that on a chassis.
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  #54  
Old 06-21-2018, 12:08 PM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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That's a beautiful system. By physically locking the pieces together instead of welding, the aluminum retains it's full strength at the joints. Welding always anneals aluminum to condition zero which is several times weaker than the original heat treated strength of the alloy.
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