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  #21  
Old 06-19-2014, 07:24 PM
Peter Tommasini Peter Tommasini is offline
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[QUOTE=
It also seems that by pushing the panel in like that makes for unstable wheeling conditions which resulted in the skewed potato chip look.

I could be wrong...but...
Is my belive that the ''potato chip'' is corsed by too much pressure too quick and too soon on a non pre wheeled panel with light pressure first, this can also happend when starting from the middle with load of pressure
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  #22  
Old 06-19-2014, 11:26 PM
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Richard K Richard K is offline
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[QUOTE=Peter Tommasini;98516][QUOTE=
It also seems that by pushing the panel in like that makes for unstable wheeling conditions which resulted in the skewed potato chip look.

I could be wrong...but...
Is my belive that the ''potato chip'' is corsed by too much pressure too quick and too soon on a non pre wheeled panel with light pressure first, this can also happend when starting from the middle with load of pressure
Peter[/QUOTE]

I looked at the video again and at around 6 minutes the guy is pushing the panel forward and in causing the long edges to buckle. At 7 min when they lay the panel on the floor you can see all sorts of rough wheel tracks were the wheeling ended about 4 to 5 inches from the ends of the panel.

As far as how to do wheeling; this video is real confusing. The more I look at it the more I wonder what is going on. The guy at the back obviously is brand new.

At one point mark says "we had to get heavy pressure to get it where we wanted it". Isn't a Cobra hood panel aluminum?

I think IMO the video is simply misleading. A how to video with a new person is probably not a good idea.
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  #23  
Old 06-20-2014, 12:42 AM
longyard longyard is offline
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[QUOTE=Richard K;98535]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Tommasini View Post

I looked at the video again and at around 6 minutes the guy is pushing the panel forward and in causing the long edges to buckle. At 7 min when they lay the panel on the floor you can see all sorts of rough wheel tracks were the wheeling ended about 4 to 5 inches from the ends of the panel.

As far as how to do wheeling; this video is real confusing. The more I look at it the more I wonder what is going on. The guy at the back obviously is brand new.

At one point mark says "we had to get heavy pressure to get it where we wanted it". Isn't a Cobra hood panel aluminum?

I think IMO the video is simply misleading. A how to video with a new person is probably not a good idea.
The results speak for themselves Richard. The panel fit perfectly, was glossy smooth, and was finished in less than an hour with a student. Few metal shapers can achieve that.
One thing I've learned from visiting many high-end shapers is that they all take different roads, but wind up at the same place...perfect panels.
Mark's video may have confused you, but Mark's student learned from it, and in fact has taken several more classes at the AAMS.
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  #24  
Old 06-20-2014, 01:44 AM
KAD KAD is offline
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I liked the video it shows that even good results can be achieved under less than perfect conditions.

The student was learning and the teacher was adapting to the problems cause by inexperienced help.
Most times if I have a bigger panel and someone else is helping with the other end they have no idea what to do so for me this is a real world situation.

For me it is much more helpful to show what to do when things go wrong than to show a perfect job from start to finish.

I really value the "what to do when things go wrong" information....

Many thanks for posting.
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  #25  
Old 06-20-2014, 01:47 AM
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Bill,
The student did not learn from the video, whatever he learned was first hand from the full project.

The video did not confuse me. It was a confusing video and I believe it is misleading to a person trying to understand this craft. It prompts more questions than it provides answers.

As an author, you are a conduit for information from others. You need to be able to confirm that the information you pass on is complete, accurate and reliable. Mark Gerish is also selling information and should be expected to do the same.
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Last edited by Richard K; 06-20-2014 at 05:37 AM.
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  #26  
Old 06-20-2014, 07:54 AM
longyard longyard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard K View Post

The video did not confuse me. It was a confusing video ....

Okay, now I'm confused!
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  #27  
Old 06-20-2014, 08:51 AM
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con·fuse

: to make (someone) uncertain or unable to understand something
: to make (something) difficult to understand

Bill,
The video is confusing. It does not add clarity to the process; it added questions that are not answered.
The video makes it difficult to understand the process used to wheel the bonnet panel. Most every post is someone making guesses about what is going on. So it apparently leaves the viewers with misunderstanding.

Bill I sent you a PM
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Last edited by Richard K; 06-20-2014 at 09:23 AM.
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  #28  
Old 06-20-2014, 12:50 PM
ed l ed l is offline
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unfortunately its going to cost $3600 bucks to get the full explanation of the video he is a great metalshaper and instruction doesnt always come free
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  #29  
Old 06-20-2014, 01:09 PM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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[QUOTE=Peter Tommasini;98516][QUOTE=
It also seems that by pushing the panel in like that makes for unstable wheeling conditions which resulted in the skewed potato chip look.

I could be wrong...but...
Is my belive that the ''potato chip'' is corsed by too much pressure too quick and too soon on a non pre wheeled panel with light pressure first, this can also happend when starting from the middle with load of pressure
Peter[/QUOTE]

I agree with you Peter. I guess you 'set' the panel before wheeling so that it holds it shape, thats what I do . The other problem with putting so much shape in one area while not wheeling another is that the top wheel can dig into the panel leaving marks on the surface.

The student helper needed a lot more instruction on where to stand, what to do with his feet and how to hold the panel. not much wonder he was running around like a headless chicken, poor guy.


David
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Last edited by David Gardiner; 06-20-2014 at 01:20 PM.
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  #30  
Old 06-21-2014, 06:57 PM
Kabous Kabous is offline
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Dont want to make heavy weather out of this issue but I want to understand the method used.

I have downloaded the video because in the next couple of months I am going to start on the body panels of a Cobra and fit them on the buck I already made, thus the interest.

Towards the end of the video there is 4 pics of which the first shows how the skew panel is bend straight. The next pic looks like the panel is being held down on the Cobra by their fingertips. The third shows marks of diagonal wheeling on the panel which seems to take care of the slight rise in the middle because the panel lies quite flat on the body.

So is that how you flatten out too high a crown, by diagonally wheeling it?
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