All MetalShaping

Go Back   All MetalShaping > General Metal Shaping Discussion > Welding Sheet Metal
  Today's Posts Posts for Last 7 Days Posts for Last 14 Days  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21  
Old 01-08-2019, 10:15 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 187
Default Flux and planishing.

Bill, you mentioned you gas tack and planish as you go. How do you deal with flux? I have tried TIG tacking but then can't get the flux on the edge between tacks. Also tried gas tacking with and without removing flux before planishing. I can appreciate the two man, all in one shot method because of the flux.
__________________
Bill Funk
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:22 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
MetalShaper of the Month August 2018
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Mukwonago, Wi
Posts: 237
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by billfunk29 View Post
Bill, you mentioned you gas tack and planish as you go. How do you deal with flux? I have tried TIG tacking but then can't get the flux on the edge between tacks. Also tried gas tacking with and without removing flux before planishing. I can appreciate the two man, all in one shot method because of the flux.
Hi,

How I was taught to prep the panel. I wire brush or scotch-brite with in a 1nch (approx.) of the edge of the panel, top and bottom. I then file both edges and wipe the surface with Isopropyl Alcohol (as taught by Kent White and Joe Stafford). I apply dots or small dabs of flux at my tack weld locations, and tack the part. The light planish that I reference, is to level and correct any distortion caused by the tack process, flux then weld.

Once the part is tacked and ready to go.

If I use Oxy/Acetylene, I brush across the top of the tacks and the seam on the top side and weld. The gap between the panel, even if it is tight, is still large enough for the flux to work. I could be wrong, and Kent can correct this if needed. When the flux is heated, it is causing a shielding gas around the weld area, to allow the weld process to occur un-contaminated. So full flux coverage is not needed, (meaning on the edge of the seam and on the back).

If I use, Oxy/Hydrogen, which has become my preferred process now. I only have to flux the filler rod and not the panel or seam.

I'm a student of this form of welding as my original background is in TIG welding. I don't have all the answers, but so far, this process has been working very well for me.

Bill
__________________
Bill Tromblay

"Remember, the camel was a horse, designed by a committee" My mentor and friend, Gil Zietz Micro Metric Machine.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:10 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 187
Default ali tacks

Thanks Bill. I will give that a try.

You mentioned Oxy/Hydrogen. Do you use tanks or a generator for your hydrogen?
__________________
Bill Funk
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:23 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
MetalShaper of the Month August 2018
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Mukwonago, Wi
Posts: 237
Default

Hi,

I use a tank. I don't think a generator, will develop enough BTU 's to weld aluminous

B
__________________
Bill Tromblay

"Remember, the camel was a horse, designed by a committee" My mentor and friend, Gil Zietz Micro Metric Machine.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:30 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.