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  #11  
Old 02-27-2019, 08:46 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllyBill View Post
It's pretty much all 2XXX for anything structural in varying degrees of hardness/temper, much of it Alclad. (a thin layer of 1XXX rolled over the underlying alloy for corrosion protection, the trade-off being that it's marginally heavier when new and an absolute bitch to weld for restorations so many years later as there is often corrosion at the boundary between the layers that you just can't see.)

Unstressed items like engine cowlings and fairings were often made of 1XXX that you can push around with your fingers.

If you can give me a DTD (Directorate of Technical Development) or BS (British Standards) spec' I'll tell you what it is in modern language.

Will
Thanks, will let you know if I have more questions. I have a DH tiger moth cowl that I'm building new. The original material is very soft, I figured it was the English equivalent to 1100 aluminum.

B
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  #12  
Old 02-28-2019, 11:11 AM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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That will be correct.

Will
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  #13  
Old 02-28-2019, 10:51 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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That will be correct.

Will
Ok... so what is the English material spec? Is it 1100 or what did they call it?

B
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  #14  
Old 03-01-2019, 02:34 AM
Peter Tommasini Peter Tommasini is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTromblay View Post
Ok... so what is the English material spec? Is it 1100 or what did they call it?

B
Bill it's not 1100 series it's called something else...... and guess what I just can not remembered right now but it will come to me
Peter
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  #15  
Old 03-01-2019, 10:17 AM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTromblay View Post
Ok... so what is the English material spec? Is it 1100 or what did they call it?

B
1100 doesn't have an old BS spec. The old American military spec is QQ-A-250/1

1200 is BS 1C and in sheet form is L16 or L17

If you have the composition I'll be able to dig out a little more for you.

Will
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Old 03-01-2019, 12:07 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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A source for UK aircraft metals:
https://www.aircraftmaterials.com/da...ium/alalu.html
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  #17  
Old 03-01-2019, 12:18 PM
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Jacob Jacob is offline
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Aircraft Spruce and Specialty has an entire section devoted to aluminum for aircraft use:


https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...s/aluminfo.php


The nice thing about the attached pdf is that it has ratings for cold workability.
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File Type: pdf aluminumalloy2.pdf (412.4 KB, 8 views)
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  #18  
Old 03-01-2019, 09:05 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Thanks Kent,

This is what I'm looking for.

Great to see the Twin Mustang up and flying.

B
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  #19  
Old 03-01-2019, 09:45 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Thank you for the info, Aircraft Spruce has a nice listing for the American materials. I have been doing structural repair and component manufacturing for many years on vintage and American warbird aircraft. As of late, I have been building parts for a DeHavilland Tiger Moth and repair work on a DeHavilland Chipmunk and a Hawker Sea Fury. I always like to make the best choice possible on material selection and substitution, especially with a 430mph Sea Fury. I'm well versed with the American aircraft aluminum from 1100 to 7075 as we form, weld and machine aircraft components every day. A danger with material substitution is compromising the overall design. You could make every part out of 2024 or 7075, or you could substitute titanium, but why make it hard on yourself, if it doesn't need to be. I had an inquiry in eleptical leading edges for a Hawker project, like a Spitfire wing. It is easy to say, use 2024, but what did the English use for an example. If the original material is more similar to 6061, than it would be easier to make than the same part out of 2024.

The English materials that I have dealt with are very different than American materials. The Tiger Moth cowl is so soft, you can put in tool marks easier than you can take them out. The pilot hit the Chipmunk wing leading edge on a runway light, I could tear the aluminum like a piece of paper English Chipmunks have a lower G rating than Canadian built Chipmunks that were built out of 2024 aluminum.

My friend and mentor would say, knowledge and skill overcomes superstition and luck.

Thanks all your help,

Bill
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  #20  
Old 03-22-2019, 11:13 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Hi I worked at Hawker DeHavilland's in the 60's in Sydney and all structural stuff was 2024 T3 hardness oil and fuel type tanks 6061 T6 there were a few other alloys also but the 2024 was the main one and it was alclad.
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