All MetalShaping

Go Back   All MetalShaping > General Metal Shaping Discussion > Basic questions and answers
  Today's Posts Posts for Last 7 Days Posts for Last 14 Days  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-23-2018, 12:37 PM
0maha 0maha is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Omaha
Posts: 10
Default Starter Tool Selections?

Well, after a few false starts, I'm back. Went down last week to my supplier's to pick through their aluminum scrap pile, but it was impossible to determine what alloy was what (they don't keep them segregated). Decided to just order a full sheet of 3003 (0.063) and have them chop it up into practice-sized pieces.

I'm ending up with 20 pieces 1' square and 10 pieces 1' x 2'.

So, the question of the moment is: What tools should I be looking at first?

I've already obtained a sandbag and a collection of three bossing mallets. Probably the only relevant stuff I have from prior projects is a TIG welder, an angle grinder, a disk sander, a small bench sander, and a bench vice. That's all I have at the moment.

I'm not so much on a budget as I am wanting to learn this from the bottom up. I don't want to rely too much on stationary tools.

I contacted a tree service, and they said they should be able to hook me up with a couple of sections of trunk. Maybe 18" diameter or so, couple of feet tall. I figure on leaving one flat, and dishing out the other. Or maybe I save space and just get one, leave it flat on one end and dish the other?

I'm leaning toward getting this Covell hammer and dolly set from Trick Tools. I am wondering if it's worth also getting this Covell slap hammer, or if that should wait. Last, I wonder if I should get some sort of vice-mounted forming dolly. Any thoughts/ideas/recommendations on that?

At some point, I'm going to need to work out a way of cutting this stuff. What's a good, simple way to start on that?

Last question: I've got a regular propane torch that I use for soldering copper pipe connections. Is that at least minimally adequate for annealing this stuff?

Thanks as always for indulging my rookie questions!
__________________
Jeff from Omaha.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-23-2018, 08:05 PM
Joe Hartson's Avatar
Joe Hartson Joe Hartson is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Pass Christian, MS
Posts: 4,955
Default

Take a look at this thread.
http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=2926

Also use the SEARCH function in the header, lots of information that will help you get started and answer other question you may have.

Good luck with learning metal shaping.
__________________
Joe Hartson

There is more than one way to go to town and they are all correct.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-23-2018, 10:57 PM
0maha 0maha is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Omaha
Posts: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Hartson View Post
Take a look at this thread.
http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=2926

Also use the SEARCH function in the header, lots of information that will help you get started and answer other question you may have.

Good luck with learning metal shaping.
Thanks for the reminder. I was just poking around and found that thread. Sorry for starting a new thread.

Got my hammer and dolly set ordered. Seems like a place to start.

Best regards.
__________________
Jeff from Omaha.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-24-2018, 07:02 PM
sandmanred sandmanred is offline
MetalShaper of the Month July 2017
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Saint Paul, MN
Posts: 174
Default

I'm a relative newbie too and the slapper is my new favorite tool, I add that to your list.


I use a mapp gas torch for annealing, not sure a propane torch for soldering will cut it unless you can find a bigger torch. I first used a tempilstick at 650F to test for annealing but using a sharpy marker and reading like the old soot coating actually works pretty well to know you got to 650F. Just keep the heat on until the sharpy mark mostly disappears and you've hit 650f.
__________________
Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-24-2018, 08:02 PM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Southisde Virginia
Posts: 141
Default

Your first tools IMO should be videos from Peter Tommasini, (http://www.handbuilt.net.au/dvds.html)
Kent White, (https://www.tinmantech.com/products/dvds/)
and David Gardiner. (https://www.classicmetalshaping.co.uk/dvd/)

David Gardiner video would be the one to watch first. It covers a lot of the basics but also goes into more advanced topics. It is excellent.

Kent White has many different DVD's on a variety of topics. Learn from a Master.

Peter Tommasini has a great collection of DVD's which include him showing step by step how he makes a 1/4 panel for a 60's musclecar with only the English wheel and hand tools. Peter has a great ability to take the complex and make it simple and understandable for us mortals.

I would recommend all three as some of your first "tools".


__________________
Chris (trying to be the best me I can be)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-24-2018, 09:00 PM
0maha 0maha is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Omaha
Posts: 10
Default

Appreciate the ideas. Lots to learn!

Something of an exciting step today. Called a tree guy and he hooked me up with a huge section of trunk off of a black walnut tree. Thing's a monster. 30" tall and 18" in diameter. Not sure what it weighs. Gotta be close to 200 pounds.
__________________
Jeff from Omaha.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-24-2018, 09:35 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
MetalShaper of the Month January 2020
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Spartanburg, SC
Posts: 2,080
Default

Get a gallon of boiled linseed oil and start soaking the ends until it absorbs no more. It may not eliminate checking, but it will help reduce it. Just keep painting the ends until it absorbs no more.

Black walnut isn't very hard, compared to other woods. I've carved a fair amount of it. You may be happy with it. If not, you can always replace it.

Back to basic tools, I took a picture of Peter's bag of tools that he brought to one of his English Wheel classes. Those tools were the same and only ones he used to do the Monaro quarter panel, so (to me) represent a realistically useful & finite group of basic tools. The pic posted here has gone to the great photobucket in the sky. I think I still have it somewhere else and will try to post it again.
__________________
AC Button II
http://CarolinaSculptureStudio.com
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzSYaYdis55gE-vqifzjA6A Carolina Sculpture Studio Channel
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-25-2018, 10:32 AM
fciron fciron is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Posts: 76
Default

Relative newby myself. Aviation snips or big tin snips are more than adequate for .063" 3003 aluminum once the larger sheet has been broken down into smaller chunks.
__________________
Lewis Meyer
Falls City Ironworks
Louisville, KY
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-25-2018, 10:46 PM
Mike Rouse Mike Rouse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Baton Rouge
Posts: 376
Default

Donít overlook river stones as forming heads
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-26-2018, 08:14 AM
RockHillWill RockHillWill is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2019
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,933
Default

Mike is not kidding. He has made a presentation about using river stones that was quite impressive.
__________________
Will
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:41 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.