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  #11  
Old 05-20-2019, 12:11 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Reno View Post
Thanks everyone. That is good information Kent. Paint prep and cleanliness is one of my weak areas. More of a wrench and shape mentality, so some test samples and experiments seem like time well spent before working on the car.

Dan - Bill Funk knows the pinch weld seam problems, and what to do if "perfection" is your goal. (it is a lot of work, BTW.)



Bill - Yes, agreed - making a production item into something hand-built requires planning and detailed execution, and understanding what the production construction elements represent, along with ways to alleviate them.
p.s -The "quote" thing is simply avoiding any rework on the section within brackets [QUOTE 123456 &whatever] and allowing it to lead your comment, intact.


Reno - Yes, practicing on spare parts is lots better than practicing on customer parts - but indeed - PRACTICE first.
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  #12  
Old 05-20-2019, 12:32 PM
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mr.c mr.c is offline
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Many years ago, I did a bunch of lead work on one of my own cars. It was an Austin Healy Sprite/MG Midget. I had several of the cars and raced one back in the sixties early seventies. So I knew where the problem areas were for rust. I ground the external hem or whatever the proper term, off the top of the rear fenders and decided lead was the only way to go to clean that up. That hem was always a source of rust since they seemed to trap moisture. Anyway gone and leaded, end of problem. There were some other known problem areas that I also leaded.
That was a long intro into how I leaded the car. This was a lifetime ago (70's ?) and even then, when I went to my paint supplier in West Palm Beach, they brought out leading supplies covered in dust and gave me a good deal on the lead and tallow and paddle. Nobody was leading anymore. I decided to try leading the car with a heat gun. A good 1000+ degree heat gun.
The beauty of using the heat gun was that I could go back and add lead in low spots and pinholes. The temperature held the lead at the "plastic" state and I could spread it like putty without the entire mass running off onto the floor. It was amazing how well it worked. I have never heard of anyone else doing this. Try it. You will be surprised how well it works. It does take a while to get up to heat but that is why it is so controllable.
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  #13  
Old 05-20-2019, 01:16 PM
Metal1 Metal1 is offline
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Originally Posted by billfunk29 View Post
Dan
Do you use polyester body filler on overlaps that are recessed like the quarter to roof areas on most 60ís to 80ís cars that are usually factory lead type filled? If you do how did it hold up? What was the prep work? Did you weld the seam solid first? Overlap and weld on another piece to fill some of the void? Iíve been looking for a good answer to this for while. Most of the time when the seams get warm especially in the sun they show up with most fillers even with lead, and even on untouched factory built cars.
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I am a hobbyest,, so I get to pick and chose my work. As a pro you have to do what the customer pays for. I totally avoid working on factory leaded seams. I cut the whole thing our and rebuild with butt welds. I used the same process on both lead and lead-free with similar results. For plastic: I use polyester up to 1/16" thick. Marine epoxy fairing compound is used in the rare event I go thicker. Epoxy sticks better, absorbs less water, but is a bugger to sand. Oh, and it is expensive. Looks like I royally screwed up the "Quote thing"
Thanks for the reply Bill.
I definitely think cutting out and butt welding when possible is definitely the best solution also.
I havenít personally done the epoxy thing, but I did work with someone that used JB weld as the main filler on a sail panel seam then polyesters over that. As far as I know it held up.
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  #14  
Old 05-21-2019, 09:19 AM
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Leadwork
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TvPr4ldiJRY
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  #15  
Old 05-21-2019, 02:45 PM
eaglefordracer eaglefordracer is offline
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Default Lead work on TR3

So, I've tried some leading on my TR3. I had the center panel, and the right front wing to do, as I had to add metal to the grill opening, and the fender encountered a road barrier.


The material from Eastwood appears to be more zinc, and doesn't paddle as well. I used 70:30 and some 50:50. By FAR the 70:30 works easiest.


As Kent stated, since the "butter" tinning contains corrosive flux, you have to clean the surface after tinning. A good hot soapy water and stiff bristle brush works. I then clean with wax and grease remover.


This was my first time to try vertical surfaces...sheesh, took some effort. The very last photograph is after vixen file. Yes, some skim coat was still necessary. I would guess it take 3-5 times longer than using plastic, but it is substantially stronger.


Just my $0.02 worth. I'm sorry if I didn't post the pictures properly.



12017-05-06 10.24.45.jpg

22017-05-06 10.24.49.jpg

32017-05-06 10.24.55.jpg

42017-05-06 10.44.26.jpg

52017-05-06 10.44.30.jpg

72017-05-06 10.54.45.jpg

92017-05-06 13.21.46.jpg

102017-05-06 18.43.08.jpg
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  #16  
Old 05-23-2019, 11:10 PM
scranm scranm is offline
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http://www.johnsonmfg.com/temp/FTOOL.HTM
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  #17  
Old 05-24-2019, 11:13 AM
ojh ojh is offline
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I neutralize after leading, not after tinning. I use a damp cloth with baking soda and scrub the area then rinse. When I don't do a good job or forget the area will quickly flash rust, I assume when I don't get the rust I've done it right.
Should I change technique to neutralize after tinning?
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  #18  
Old 05-25-2019, 04:05 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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I neutralize after leading, not after tinning. I use a damp cloth with baking soda and scrub the area then rinse. When I don't do a good job or forget the area will quickly flash rust, I assume when I don't get the rust I've done it right.
Should I change technique to neutralize after tinning?

Hi O.J.
For "fail-safe" leadwork, the top guys neutralize the flux acids after tinning and before applying the solder.
(BTW - I am Not a fan of paddling or spraying alloys at the 50-50 levels.
40-60 okay, 70-30 better. The 50-50 hardens way too fast for me, although other guys may be quick to paddle after heating - or just smoke and flame their paddles and then clean off / file off the carbon after paddling.)
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  #19  
Old 06-10-2019, 07:09 PM
Sinister Sleds Sinister Sleds is offline
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Originally Posted by scranm View Post
Far better than the Eastwood stuff.

My process is similar to Gene Winfield's technique.

1. grind area but not further than I plan on applying lead. 2. Clean pits with a dremel carbide file or a drill bit with the tip ground off (Gene's trick)
3. Clean with acetone (probably not necessary)
4. Tin a larger area than needed with the Johnson's tinning.
5. Let cool and clean with a mixture of baking soda and water.
6. Blow dry.
7. Using acetone or wax and grease remover scrub with steel wool.
8. Apply lead (I clean the lead with acetone and steel wool)
9. Bump low areas and file.
10. Clean again with the soda & water
11. Scrub again with the acetone and paint prep several times.
12. Usually hit with rusticide , ospho or metal prep. (Entire panel)
13. Final sand then clean and prep for paint

So far it has worked for me.

I also never tin inside the shop only outside. Once tinned I will bring the panel inside and clean. I don't mind applying lead inside. You can sand the lead with 36 and 80 grits but I prefer sealing with epoxy the performing any needed flatwork. Biggest things to remember are cleaning the metal prior to tinning remove all paint and rust then cleaning the acid properly.
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  #20  
Old 06-14-2019, 10:58 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
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Default Lead source

I was searching for a silver solder for tungsten when I found this.
https://www.kappalloy.com/solder-alloy/


Looks like they have some new stuff that does vertical better. I also noticed they sell a galvanize touch up. Anyone try that? I am wondering if it could be used on the pinch area of a door skin/frame?


And, I am still looking for a low temp way to solder tungsten, like to a circuit board.
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