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  #11  
Old 09-01-2009, 12:13 AM
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Yes, I use the Lipton hammer 90% of the time. I fall in the 'old dogs and new tricks' category. I'm so comfortable tuck shrinking and have taught it to so many people, I just can't get excited about stumps...
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  #12  
Old 09-01-2009, 12:19 AM
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I think it is just what ever works.

The reason I asked about the Tom Lipton hammer is because if you did it with my hammer on aluminum,you would just destroy it.
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  #13  
Old 09-01-2009, 12:21 AM
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I never cracked the code on using a modified door skin steel hammer like Wray uses..
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  #14  
Old 09-01-2009, 01:46 PM
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Not really adding anything here but as a novice shaper i'm finding that i am developing both methods , i like my stump's but not the noise but am finding that some of the tucks i get from the stump work out better with a kirk style hammer / technique . some jobs you just can't do on the stump like the corners on the brooklands cans i make each one gets better as i seem to be getting more shrink with each tuck i crush down guess my skill level is slowly getting better.
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  #15  
Old 09-01-2009, 05:59 PM
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Chris

From my understanding there is no need beat out the tuck like Kirk,when stump shrinking.When you strike your blow and cause a tuck, it is already trapped.So all you have to do is hammer it down.
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  #16  
Old 09-01-2009, 08:14 PM
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Hi guys,

Tuck shrinking is the current fave over here, mostly because of the teeny-weeny types of projects I tend to work on most of the time. I actually have a pretty nice Maple stump I made a couple of years ago, but it hasn't seen much use outside of the regional meets I have over here, as I simply can't use it to place a tuck the exact size in exactly the right place on the small parts I'm usually working on (car fenders and ball caps are very different critters I've discovered!). I am thinking of making up a set of scale replica 34 Ford roadster body panels for my ridem' lawnmower though, so maybe a larger project like that will be a good time to work on my stump shrinking technique.

Tuck shrinking is definitely hard work, but developing your hammering technique goes a long way for getting your moneys worth out of your efforts. I expend about a quarter of the effort I used to when I first started, and I'm doing it with a hammer that weighs half as much as the ones I started with. The little aluminum hammer on the right is the one I use to pound down tucks all the time now, including when I work with 18 guage CRS! I can pound tucks all afternoon with that hammer, and still have an arm left at the end of the day to wheel out the tucks I made in my english wheel.



The only difference nowadays is the wedge shaped UHMW tucking head, which I have changed out to a dome shape, because they take longer to hack up and they tend to be easier on the 3003 aluminum.

As far as the direction of approach to hammer down a tuck goes (inside to outside or vice versa), I tend to be pretty flexible about that depending on the available access. When I was hammering down tucks inside the neck of the spiral vase, I was lucky to get a hammer in there in the first place, so the restricted access forced me to take them any way I could get at them on an individual basis. This comes up a fair bit around here, so every new small project is a new learning experience.

All that said, I plan on replacing myself with a machine for this task pretty soon! A reciprocating hammer with a set of shrinking dies sounds pretty cool after manually pounding down a million or so tucks, so I can see one of those in my workshop before too long.

Ken

Last edited by kenb; 09-02-2009 at 08:44 AM.
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  #17  
Old 09-02-2009, 02:37 AM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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To me there is not a preferance because 'blocking' and 'hollowing' on a stump is a completely different thing to tucking and has a totaly different use its like saying which do you prefer shrinking or stretching?. One technique would be used for one job and the other for another. Its a case of which is going to be best for that job.
When you use a stump you are partly stretching and partly shrinking the panel.

David
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  #18  
Old 09-02-2009, 03:40 AM
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So are you saying they are not two different methods of shrinking?
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  #19  
Old 09-02-2009, 05:34 AM
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Blocking and hollowing are not the only operations that can be carried out on the stump.

I've been told that working on the stump is more of a drawing operation than stretching. For me, it depends on how I put the material on the stump and where I hit it. If you leave the edge of the panel hanging over the hollow of the stump and start beating, you can encourage the sympathetic ruffles to form along the edge, and then shrink them into themselves using the hollow of the stump to help trap them.

I can work over the hollow of the stump and have little to no formation of sympathetic ruffles, or a I can move the edge over the hollow and get a lot. When I work on the bag, I tend to get more sympathetic ruffles, which shows me the metal is being drawn toward the center and not really stretching.

It's more technique than tools or "operations". It's not blocking or hollowing, it is shrinking using the stump to help form the tucks instead of using a tucking fork or the like.

I'll also admit to having no clue what the "Kirk-style" shrinking hammer or technique are. I didn't have much luck the the modified door skin hammer either. As I said earlier, what I know about tuck shrinking came from Wray, Randy, Kerry and John Kelly. If they haven't advised it, I likely haven't tried it. That said, stump shrinking is still tuck shrinking - you just don't need an extra tool to form the tucks.

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!

Tim D.
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  #20  
Old 09-02-2009, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
...When you use a stump you are partly stretching and partly shrinking the panel.
I agree. Anytime you hit a panel, you're pushing the metal in the path of least resistance. If you're over a hole in a stump, the subsequent stretch is what causes the tuck to form, which can then be shrunk. Since most panels are made by both stretching and shrinking it works fine.
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