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  #11  
Old 08-07-2018, 08:58 PM
Schroeder Schroeder is offline
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1. IDJ, the plan was to replicate the spoiler exactly like the factory had it, but as you mentioned, making it a sharp edge at the top so it was obvious that the thing wasn't factory would be cool. This would also give it a bit of a custom touch. I like this and think it's worth looking at and pursuing. I do want to specify that I didnt plan on "splicing" into the trunk skin or the quarters. I was going to bolt this thing down in the same way the factory did, but I was going to TIG the seams with the trunk lid and quarters with the maganese filler rod. I think that's the material you use for quarter to rocker and other such interfaces as this one. I have some of the stuff out in the shop, but I forget the name. I'm sure you guys know what I'm talking about. I won't be cutting the quarters or trunk lidtk accommodate this mod.

2. crystallographic, why do you suggest to solder this all together as opposed to TIG'ing it together with steel filler? Is that just so the welds (or solder seems in this case) are soft and easy to work with and hammer? How do you suggest I actually bend the small 3/16 bend you mentioned? Is this with an English wheel and some sort of tipping die as drive drunk has mentioned? Is it with a bead roller and a special die?

3.) jmcglynn, is this the original book you're talking about? If it's rich with pics I think I'll pick it up.

Sheet Metal Handbook: How to Form and Shape Sheet Metal for Competition, Custom and Restoration Use https://www.amazon.com/dp/0895867575..._D3JABb290DBC4

Does anyone know if there is an e-book version for purchase? I'd love to have it on my phone and reference as needed after reading it thoroughly. It's been awhile since a book has caught my intrest! As stated in point one, you guys are starting to make me wonder about the custom spoiler. I think it might be nice especially since I'm taking the time to make this intricate piece. Might as well give it a special touch.

I like the method you outline. It sounds like this method would mean the piece is made of 4+ pieces. Do the cross-section profiles and the 3/16" round stock stay in place after the metal is applied over them or are they removed after the template is planned and mocked up and replaced only with a couple pieces?


Do you guys order 3/16" hot rolled steel rod from the same suppliers like aleo steel where you get your other metal stock from?

I finally got my chance to sit down and respond! Not sure if I'm gonna do the soldering or the forming with profiles and rod yet.
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2018, 02:41 AM
drivejunk drivejunk is offline
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I guess I had heard you mention blending it in but assumed that meant something different.
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  #13  
Old 08-08-2018, 09:04 AM
jmcglynn jmcglynn is offline
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Originally Posted by Schroeder View Post
3.) jmcglynn, is this the original book you're talking about? If it's rich with pics I think I'll pick it up.

Sheet Metal Handbook: How to Form and Shape Sheet Metal for Competition, Custom and Restoration Use https://www.amazon.com/dp/0895867575..._D3JABb290DBC4
The book I was thinking about is the "Metal Fabricator's Handbook" by Ron Fournier. You couldn't go wrong getting both of his books IMO.

In terms of leaving the ribs / tubing or not, you could go either way. Certainly lots of custom stuff has been done over the years by outlining it with round rod (or tubing or even EMT...ick!) and then paneling it in with sheetmetal. Lots of pics in 1970s/80s Hot Rod/Car Craft mags showing places like "Customs by Eddie Paul" doing this. 1/4" round rod, flat sheet fill and then bondo'd. The more you can shape, fit, weld, grind to get the shape the better. At some point having the internal structure may get in the way of doing a clean job and you'll want to get rid of it, but the point is to create something cool doing the best quality work you can.

When I was a kid there was a guy in the neighborhood that was building an early Falcon with giant flares and a wing spoiler. He was doing it using plywood screwed to the car, aluminum strapping, fiberglass over that, and lots of bondo to get the shape. God awful construction methods, but he ended up with a pretty cool look and only needed a jigsaw, drill and sandpaper

These two pics are from the first book showing part of a spoiler build.




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  #14  
Old 08-08-2018, 11:51 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Schroeder View Post
1.

2. crystallographic, why do you suggest to solder this all together as opposed to TIG'ing it together with steel filler? Is that just so the welds (or solder seems in this case) are soft and easy to work with and hammer? How do you suggest I actually bend the small 3/16 bend you mentioned? Is this with an English wheel and some sort of tipping die as drive drunk has mentioned? Is it with a bead roller and a special die?

TIG can make distortion on this part, and since it is enclosed ... how do you get inside to iron that out?
Soldering makes a strong part for this application, but unless you do a fair amount of this fab stuff you will not see this design element.
Just hand work the edge over a bit of round bar tig-welded to a handle - you do have a TIG, right?`
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  #15  
Old 08-08-2018, 08:05 PM
Schroeder Schroeder is offline
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Originally Posted by drivejunk View Post
I guess I had heard you mention blending it in but assumed that meant something different.

When I said "blend" I meant fill the seam between the custom spoiler and trunk skin with silica bronze TIG weld. How do I address shrinkage here? I guess I never thought of that. I see guys use silica bronze as TIG filler for filling in outside seams between panels because it looks nice, but how are they addressing shrinkage? In 100% of the scenarios I can think of you can't get to the back side of the weld they did. Is it just that silica bronze can be put in with such a cool weld?


Thanks for the pics and info, jmcglynn.


crystallographic, I do have a nice TIG welder. I guess if I TIG'ed it together I'd have to leave the bottom face that mated with the top of the trunk open. This might be difficult. Seriously though, stuff like this can be SOLDERED together and not come apart in 10 years?! I would have never guessed. What about making some tack or plug welds with the TIG or MIG and then quickly cooling them with compressed air but filling the whole seams in with solder? I see conflicting theories and advice on whether or not compressed air should be used to cool sheet metal welds. Some guys say NEVER. Some guys say always. The "NEVER!"'s seem to be much more resounding though.
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  #16  
Old 08-09-2018, 05:41 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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crystallographic, Seriously though, stuff like this can be SOLDERED together and not come apart in 10 years?!

I wonder how many millions of soldered radiators have been put in cars over the past 120 years....
Or soldered gas tanks....


Rapid cooling of hot steel makes hard steel. Like gravity, it works whether you are aware of it or not.
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  #17  
Old 08-12-2018, 11:46 PM
jmcglynn jmcglynn is offline
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Rapid cooling of hot steel makes hard steel. Like gravity, it works whether you are aware of it or not.
that's funny Kent, I'm stealing that line.

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