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  #11  
Old 06-23-2014, 10:20 AM
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Richard K Richard K is offline
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I sure didn't realize he was demonstrating how to fix a bad weld. It simply looked like the weld was out of his control. And it did not show the tacking process.
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  #12  
Old 06-23-2014, 10:52 AM
toreadorxlt toreadorxlt is offline
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before i go out and play with this tonight... what should i set my oxygen and acetylene at on the regulators?
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  #13  
Old 06-23-2014, 11:00 AM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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You need about three pounds of pressure, modern guages are not that great unless you spend a small fortune so you may need to set them at four pounds. I would not go any higher. Both need to be the same. set you torch to a neutral flame and then turn the oxygen down a bit to get a carburising flame. (also known as a carbonizing flame)

I show a bit about setting up in the footage I linked to earlier as well as the welding process for ally and steel.

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  #14  
Old 06-23-2014, 11:14 AM
longyard longyard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toreadorxlt View Post
before i go out and play with this tonight... what should i set my oxygen and acetylene at on the regulators?
Hi Steve,
I've seen gauges set all over the place from 2psi to 23! In the bonus footage Mark's acety is at 11psi and oxygen at 23psi! One of the problems is regulators and whether or not they are single or two stage, or how brittle the diaphragms have become over time. Some of the new single stage regs. are very good indeed, but if you have a stiff diaphragm on an old regulator it is better to increase the pressure because the pressure will be held more steadily. Steady pressure is the key.

Most regulators can be rebuilt if their diaphragms have age hardened. Just ask at your local welding supply house and they'll direct you to someone who can do it.
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  #15  
Old 06-23-2014, 11:29 AM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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Like Bill said if your guages are knackered get them fixed or get new ones. It would be dangerouse to use them in that sort of condition. The correct setting for a tip of the size used for welding ally in 18 or 16g (1.2mm or 1.5mm) is as I said. If that can't be judged because the guages are old and not working its time to fix them.

If you were to have the settings at pressures of ten pounds or over you would have a lot of problems, you would tend to blow holes and your torch would emit a loud hissing sound, this is not correct. In fact that would be the case at anything over the correct settings getting worse as the pressures go up. If you could just guess at it you would not need the guages you would just have a valve.

For cutting 1/4 inch steel you would only need 25 lb of oxygen pressure! much less for the accetylene.

The main difference in single or two stage regulators is the ease of setting up and the stability of the flame, with single stage regulators, especially cheap ones they tend to need to be adjusted more regularly to keep the flame correct. not a real problem its just nice not to have to when you weld several hours every day like I do.
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Last edited by David Gardiner; 06-23-2014 at 11:37 AM.
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  #16  
Old 06-23-2014, 12:18 PM
kjc kjc is offline
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This is just plain silly......

Most of us learn without the aid of hands on instruction. We need to learn from our mistakes, by travelling too fast and getting insufficient penetration, and by travelling too slowly and blowing holes (amongst other errors). Eventually, hopefully, we can live between those two extremes.

Personally, I still blow the occasional hole in steel, let alone aluminum!

I think David, you're living in Fairy land if you think the average guy doesn't need to know how to fix his screw ups, and can just learn to "weld properly in the first place"



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Sorry but it would be better to show people how to weld properly and avoid burning holes in the first place.

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  #17  
Old 06-23-2014, 12:41 PM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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OK well if people want to learn how not to do things thats fine but I think that is just a bit silly. Learn how not to set your pressures properly, learn how not to weld properly, thats fine I was just trying to help people with correct information. I learned to use my DSLR Camera wiith the aid of books and magazines but once I took a course at college I realised how little I knew. I guess people don't need this forum to learn either. so its all a bit silly really.

I did not say that people would not blow holes but as you say they dont need hands on instructions on how to blow holes and they don't need hands on instructions on how to fill them. In learning the proper techniques you will know how to fill holes because as I said in my earlier post its the same thing. To think that one needs instruction on blowing holes is "Fairy Land" to me.


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Last edited by David Gardiner; 06-23-2014 at 12:58 PM.
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  #18  
Old 06-23-2014, 01:02 PM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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I have spent more than an hour trying to scan a section of a book listing proper settings for gas welding pressures as set out by BOC but I could not get it clear enough to upload and post. I thought it might help people. I guess I have wasted my time seeing as I am living in "Fairy Land".

David
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  #19  
Old 06-23-2014, 01:31 PM
kjc kjc is offline
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Good grief....... Grow up.


Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
I have spent more than an hour trying to scan a section of a book listing proper settings for gas welding pressures as set out by BOC but I could not get it clear enough to upload and post. I thought it might help people. I guess I have wasted my time seeing as I am living in "Fairy Land".

David
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  #20  
Old 06-23-2014, 01:33 PM
longyard longyard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
I have spent more than an hour trying to scan a section of a book listing proper settings for gas welding pressures as set out by BOC but I could not get it clear enough to upload and post. I thought it might help people. I guess I have wasted my time seeing as I am living in "Fairy Land".

David

I'm sure a lot of people would be interested in those figures if you can get them posted.

Most weldors use between 2 and 4psi on the acet. and oxy, and I'm aware that Mark's 11/23 figures are real out-lyers. I wondered if his gauges were wonky.
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