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  #31  
Old 05-12-2012, 12:33 AM
donc donc is offline
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I bought his book too after I read all the good reviews here. It will take many reads to absorb it all. Great info there.
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  #32  
Old 07-14-2012, 08:23 PM
Nawrocki Fabricating Nawrocki Fabricating is offline
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Default Addition to the book.

Rolling flat panels by yourself without a helper is always difficult. The book described how turning the roller to a desired angle helped to solve this problem. In addition to this I suggest one more method how to finish rolling flat panels. The best idea is to turn the machine upside down and to roll the panel upside down.
The gravity keeps the panel always open and straight. It will make a big difference in achieving a beautiful finish of such panels. Cass.

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  #33  
Old 07-15-2012, 02:43 AM
SATAUS SATAUS is offline
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Hi Cass,

Thanks for the wheeling large panel trick thatís a keeper.

In your book you have a hand held shrinker that is air/hyd operated
can you please explain how you did the movement of the arms e.g.
small air or hydraulic cylinder and do you have some clearer photos of the shrinker?
It looks very similar to the Eckold HF100 stretcher/shrinker.

Scott
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  #34  
Old 01-13-2013, 10:25 AM
Nawrocki Fabricating Nawrocki Fabricating is offline
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Rollers.


The main purpose of writing my book was to pass on my knowledge and experience in metal shaping. I've chosen not to repeat subjects described in other books and DVDs. I wrote only about some innovations, which were not in the other books. Page #2 of my book says: " However, the well known fabricating processes and techniques are beyond the scope of this book: there is plentiful literature on the subject."
Today I'd like to pass on another piece of important information. Page #37 of my book says about rollers: "The smaller they are, the more they stretch and the faster they stretch."
Conventionally, a small roller is on the bottom. The bottom side of rolled panel stretches more as the panel goes all the way around and up. The gravity is pushing it down so the panel is forced to go down. By forcing the panel to go down the small roller creates stress inside the metal. The stretched panel rolled this way needs to be clamped to the buck or pushed by hand.
Reverse the rollers locations to put the small roller is on top. Then it stretches the top side of panel more then the bottom side of panel resting on a big roller. Therefore the panel will curve down automatically and naturally. The panels rolled this way are relaxed; they don't need to be clamped to the buck.
This method is good mainly for rolling flat panels, which are hard to do otherwise. The panel supported by the top of big roller is much easier to run. I would compare this process to walking on flat shoes instead of high hill shoes. The small roller on top doesn't block the light and allows to see the panel better.
My top roller is 3 and half inch diameter and has a flat cylindrical shape. The bottom roller is 8" diameter and slightly curved.
I know some would hesitate whether it worth doing. I understand, it is more comfortable to stay on the well known ground than try something outside the box. However, I believe it would be only the matter of time. As for myself, I fill almost guilty how easy it is to roll flat panels this way.
Good luck, Cass

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  #35  
Old 01-13-2013, 12:00 PM
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Joe Hartson Joe Hartson is offline
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Cass, thanks for the additional information and pictures.
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  #36  
Old 01-13-2013, 02:24 PM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Cass Thanks for posting the pictures. I will have to try that process, it makes sense to me.

Steve
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  #37  
Old 01-13-2013, 03:06 PM
Phil Minton Phil Minton is offline
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Cass,

Great tips and I really enjoyed your book. Your practical approach to solving problems makes so much sense and looking at the photographs reveals more of your innovation on each viewing.
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  #38  
Old 01-13-2013, 10:19 PM
SATAUS SATAUS is offline
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Hi Cass,

I ask a question about your air/hyd portable shrinker it is below in this message, can you please explain how it works.

Scott


Quote:
Originally Posted by SATAUS View Post
Hi Cass,

Thanks for the wheeling large panel trick thatís a keeper.

In your book you have a hand held shrinker that is air/hyd operated
can you please explain how you did the movement of the arms e.g.
small air or hydraulic cylinder and do you have some clearer photos of the shrinker?
It looks very similar to the Eckold HF100 stretcher/shrinker.

Scott
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  #39  
Old 01-13-2013, 10:46 PM
Jimmy Hervatin Jimmy Hervatin is offline
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Default Thank you Cass

Your book is fantastic. Seen your work in pictures about 20 years ago. Became a fan of you then. Thanks for sharing all the info in your book with us. You have done some incredible work in your life time you should be very proud of your accomplishments. You are one of the TOP GUNS.
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