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  #891  
Old 03-25-2019, 06:09 AM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Originally Posted by Gojeep View Post
Thanks mate.

No these were spot welded directly to the support! I'll show you in the next update but had 26 spot welds holding it. I wont be doing it that way though as they do show up under a good paint job.
Holy distortion, Batman!

That's what I had understood from the mentions of spot welds, but couldn't believe it. On a service vehicle to be abused & discarded, it makes sense. For a nice project, there's got to be a better way. We'll be watching as it transpires..
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  #892  
Old 03-25-2019, 10:23 AM
James. V. D. W James. V. D. W is offline
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I have seen guys use a seam sealer to fit these braces as they do in the factory, but I found that windscreen polyurethane is allot more rigid, but forms nicely to the panel. I would also be apprehensive about spot welding on such a visible panel.
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  #893  
Old 03-30-2019, 06:28 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Time to start on the rear bonnet support. I got the two originals I made the bonnet skin from to use. I was very surprised to find how many spot welds went through the outer exposed skin. One had 26 in all! Normally on cars this is never done, especially on large panel such as this, as it shows up through the paint work as the skin expands and contracts with temperature. It will pull on the welds even if it was not visible as time of paint preparation. I will use an adhesive/sealer and spots welds only on the flange at the ends which I will add to these. It will also be held down by the clamping of the hinge screws.


I came up with a way to easily make level mounts for the hinges. There was a 4mm difference from one side to the other so made new threaded plates out of some 4mm plate. It is welded in flush on one side and sits up the plate thickness on the other so it stays level under the hinge while the support curves downwards.


Can really see how much wider the cowl and how different the curvature is. The rise is the same, but over a longer distance, so it is shallower overall. I will have to alter the support completely from one end to the other to match it. I will hammer right long the bottom edge only, as pictured, to stretch it which will reduce the curvature.


With the profile now matching the cowl between the outer bends, it is time to measure where to cut and then fit the ends from the other bonnet support to lengthen it.


I have only tacked one side of the join so I can make final adjustment once it is bolted to the hinges and matches the cowl.


I think it would have been better if I had made the support first and then made the skin match it. I have some excess material left and what is shown is about half of what I started with before using the shrinking disk to reduce it.


I have shrunk down the skin a lot more over the support but it leaves excess further down the skin as expected. I was having trouble getting this down any further with the shrinking disc.


Something I have done for years, but possibly never shown, is I use tacks as a heat shrink. I don't have an oxy and this has more control than my propane torch. Like with the shrinking disc, I don't use compressed air or a wet rag to shrink it while hot. The metal stays much more workable this way.


This is what the same spot looks like after only sanding the tacks and then, not before, hammering it down into a rubber dolly so as not to stretch the area.


A bit more work with the shrinking disc around the surrounding area and it is nearly there.


Not far off now and think I will use the same tack technique here.


Can see how much closer the centre is as well and hopefully some tacking will get it flush. It will stick out above the cowl edge if I don't get it down flush.
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  #894  
Old 03-30-2019, 03:31 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gojeep View Post
Time to start on the rear bonnet support.

I have shrunk down the skin a lot more over the support but it leaves excess further down the skin as expected. I was having trouble getting this down any further with the shrinking disc.





Can see how much closer the centre is as well and hopefully some tacking will get it flush. It will stick out above the cowl edge if I don't get it down flush.

Marcus,
You have a very good handle on shrinking the steel flat surface !
I have an old LencoSpot that makes a bunch of real consistent little hot spots for hot shrinks. And the panel sure stays workable - if you leave the cold water in the plumbing, where it is ready to make coffee or quench thirst.
I see you broght that swell down about 25% each time. Real patient and methodical. (No sense hurrying to the junk yard, eh?)
Real nice work.
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Last edited by crystallographic; 03-30-2019 at 03:36 PM.
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  #895  
Old 03-30-2019, 03:53 PM
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pplace pplace is offline
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This has always been my favorite project on here. Your attention to detail and planning is second to non! I like your tip about shrinking with tack welds. Thanks
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  #896  
Old 03-31-2019, 03:55 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Thanks guys. I must try using the tig to do the same one day too. That should work as well and less grinding, if any at all.
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  #897  
Old 03-31-2019, 05:53 AM
Oldnek Oldnek is offline
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Marcus,

Splendid, Absolutely Splendid.

Beautiful to watch.
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  #898  
Old 04-01-2019, 04:28 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Marcus,

Splendid, Absolutely Splendid.

Beautiful to watch.
Many thanks John.

Been thinking of you and what you went through with the bonnet you repaired after warping from sandblasting. F100?
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  #899  
Old 04-06-2019, 06:27 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Rather than tacking with the mig like shown before, this time I thought I would try using the tig. I had the pedal adjusted to 50 amp max and mashed the pedal until it just got a gloss to it. Then moved to the next one. Worked even better as didn't have a tack to grind down afterwards.


Once it had naturally cooled I hit it with a hammer directly over the heated spot into the flat palm of my hand. The panel actually looks worse straight after heating as it has gathered up metal from around it. So you hit the spots with a sweeping strike in different directions away from it.


The high spot over the support was also worked the same way and is now gone. The reason this bonnet needed so much shrinking over the whole panel is I actually need less crown than before due to the wider bonnet that rises to the same overall height as before, but over a longer distance.


Thought I would add I little more high tech look under the bonnet as will have a modern engine. So going to use dimple die pressings. I tested the 3/4" size which was the largest I could fit inside the support, but didn't like the look. The 1" size shown was too big however.


So turned down the outside diameter on my lathe until it fitted. The flat area left around the dimple was still enough to do it's job of removing any distortion.


Can see the 3/4" and 1" pressing, (1.5" to the outside of the dimple), next to each other in the test piece. Just thought the bigger size had better proportions.


Halfway through drilling all the holes I want just using a step drill.


All drilled and pressed. I left the corners so it didn't flattened them out and they get distorted as well. Left the areas above the hinges and centre rib as think it looks better and what you find on aircraft as well where this technique comes from.


In place and bolted together on the Willys for the first time to see how it will all line up.


It sat a few millimeters low in the middle as the pressings would have flattened it slightly. So cut a piece of timber a bit long and carefully closed the bonnet over it to bend it upwards.


Now have a nice even height all the way along.


The gap isn't too bad either with only a slight bit of work needed towards the middle.


Something I need to address before moving on is I don't like how the lower bonnet edge comes up a bit short. In stock form it actually goes past the end of the guard but I wanted the rest of the bonnet to line up above the grille where the taper finishes.


View from the other side doesn't look good either.


So cut it and pulled the inner flange forward to line up with the end.


Placed some copper behind it and welded it up.


I like how it tapers towards the end now.


Next up is the front support. Won't be much I can use from the stock one!
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  #900  
Old 04-06-2019, 06:43 PM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Looks great Marcus - nice fit!
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