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  #21  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:48 AM
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mr.c mr.c is offline
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Todd: I think that what Peter is recommending is to place the horizontal piece on top of the vertical piece but slide the edge back about half way so that you have the corners of both pieces are exposed with the ninety degree valley created by sliding it back from the edge. Weld down the valley melting both corners as the filler without rod. I know that this would be really tough with the thin material that you are using. Give it a try on some coupons with some thicker stock.
If you have gas welding available,I would recommend practicing with that so that you can get a feel for watching and moving the puddle of molten metal. It is all about the puddle. Gas takes dipping the tungsten out of the equation. Practice on some scrap flat stock just running some puddles. Then do some more adding rod as you go. Then go back to your tig and run some beads. Now you have to keep the tungsten out of the puddle and the rod. It all takes practice. You may have seen the welding that I did on a little aluminum project that I posted here in the last week or so. I was way out of practice. Probably hadn't done aluminum in a year. I fouled my tungsten a bunch of times.
Do some practice runs and then go back to your wheel tubs and run your puddle to clean up your welds. You have enough metal laid down so don't add any more. Just go back over what you have but focus on the puddle. Clean it up with a clean stainless steel brush before you reweld.

Here is a video that shows the positioning of the metal. I watch every video that he puts out. Buy a tig finger or two from him. You need to prop your hands to steady the torch and the rod. Getting a good prop is difficult. Watch his videos and see him do practice sweeps to test his prop before he welds.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiWSZ...4MAwx5nsN4H0QO
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e92EY...4MAwx5nsN4H0QO
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Last edited by mr.c; 04-10-2013 at 12:10 PM. Reason: add video url
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  #22  
Old 04-10-2013, 09:23 PM
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HEATNBEAT HEATNBEAT is offline
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Your post:
Help me figure out how to roll the edge of my wheel tub.

Tony K showed you a very nice and easy way to make your part. It can't get any easier than that. I would just follow his post to a T and you will be very happy with your results.
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  #23  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:51 PM
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Bill Gibson Bill Gibson is offline
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I agree Rick... Start Over
Get some 18 guage and take the time to get the fits correct and Practice welding on coupons until they look good then weld the tubs... Like Peter says over lap one side half the material thickness and fuse weld will be best, but that takes a lot of practice...
I would suggest welding downhill with a MIG for a beginner...
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  #24  
Old 04-11-2013, 12:55 AM
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I agree Tony showed the best way to do this . I don't believe you can hammer form the radius you want until you grind down those weld beads.
Sometimes on both sides. You only will get better.Today I practiced gas fusion welding and I only got 5 or 6 inches I was proud of.
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  #25  
Old 04-11-2013, 12:16 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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The big mistake I see here is not practicing the welding style needed on scrap metal of similar thickness. If you can’t get the needed welding results on scrap it’s not going to magically happen on the actual part.


I learned fusion gas welding skills making headers (actually pretty good to learn on because tubing doesn’t warp from heat) as a kid when most other kids had paper routes, sadly my skills have waned since tig welding and even eye sight fading. You can butt weld with a mig but grinding the welds level to the panel and hammering mig welded seams flat is troublesome at best, tig or gas welding is the way to go IMO. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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Last edited by John Buchtenkirch; 04-11-2013 at 04:38 PM.
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  #26  
Old 04-11-2013, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Buchtenkirch View Post
You can fusion weld with a mig but grinding the welds level to the panel and hammering mig welded seams flat is troublesome at best...
You must explain this to me John.
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  #27  
Old 04-11-2013, 01:32 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CARS View Post
You must explain this to me John.
SORRY about that….. I really meant to say “butt weld with a mig”, obviously a fusion weld with a mig is impossible. THANKS for catching & correcting me on that. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:41 PM
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Dang, here I thought I was going to learn something new today.
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  #29  
Old 04-13-2013, 10:31 AM
WCRiot WCRiot is offline
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I am starting the second wheel well from 20ga sheetmetal. I will post pictures as I weld and as things progress. Unfortunately I am working through the weekend so I wont have much time for my hobby

quick question: My 220V TIG welder is on a dedicated fuse of its own with its own wiring straight to the outlet.
Why is the welder causing the TV picture to dim and occasionally causing the lights to dim a little bit?
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  #30  
Old 04-13-2013, 11:48 AM
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My MIG does the same thing. The electrician couldn't nail down the exact reason. I just live with it.
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