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  #1  
Old 09-12-2014, 06:43 PM
WCRiot WCRiot is offline
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Default Need advice: How to re-create Trunk drop tray.

This is my first project using a Shrinker/Stretcher and I need some advice. Maybe i don't even need the shrinker/strecher, but i thought it would make things easier and nicer.

I need and want to recreate The drip tray which is part of the body under the trunk lid. The area i am referring to is shown with the red colored arrows that i point to. This i not my car by the way...


After i do this, i want to rebuild the wheel arches for my truck. The guy that restored that car did a terrible job in that area.

Here is the tool. Picked this baby up for cheap. Pretty excited as i have been looking for a while.


How should i start this off? What other tools will i need? I was thinking of two different approaches:
1. seems more complicated to stretch and shrink. Bend a U shape that is about 3 or so feet long. Shrink one leg of the U to start the bend, then go to the opposite leg of the U to stretch it. Never touch the bottom area of the U

2. Make an L shape. Rather than completely cutting out the drip tray, i would cut out one side and the bottom of it. I would leave the leg that is part of the body and weld my newly formed shape to that.

I am leaning towards option 2 as the factory drop tray has the most rust damage in the bottom the U shape from standing water on those rainy 1950's days. It also seems significantly easier to work with an L shape of sheet metal than a U shape.
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:23 PM
Oldnek Oldnek is offline
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Hi Todd.

I would take your option 2 method for sure. There will be no doubt that you will have to shrink/stretch in both directions(Both sides of you L shape)
If you did the same piece in a U channel section it would be hard for you to get the machine in there to bend it, and could only work the shape in one plane, not 2 which you will need to do.

Good on you for having a go, and to buy a machine to try it on
Just remember to take your time and make your panel sections first before cutting out the old.
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:36 PM
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ekdave1962 ekdave1962 is offline
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some solid advise from john considering he just did a great job on the drip trays on the truck he is restoring

grrz john just looked Ulladulla up on map i was in batemans bay last week and its only just up the rd from you if i had have know i would have dropped in :-(
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:55 PM
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MP&C MP&C is offline
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Todd, I have a suggestion for a section near the tail light, I have done a similar shape on a smaller scale in repairing the trunk in a Fairlane. You should be able to make that section by tipping the side flanges at 45's, performing the shrinks, and tipping the remainder. See pic 3 and 4 below in particular...



Quote:
Well, on to the next corner. The driver's side was in sad shape:



But in looking at the replacement, although in better condition, it did have issues of it's own.



Time to break out the trusty Lancasters and make some replacement parts.



The corner was left attached to the quarter panel section while remaking the channel in an attempt to maintain the shape.















Got the repaired piece all cleaned up, and the car prepped for it to go in.






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Old 09-12-2014, 09:00 PM
Oldnek Oldnek is offline
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Robert! you carry out some high quality work in your shop, Awesome
Love all the photos you post to follow. Thanks for taking time out to share.

Cheers John
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:46 AM
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Thanks John!
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Old 09-13-2014, 03:35 PM
keith keith is offline
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Nice stuff Robert!
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:59 PM
WCRiot WCRiot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MP&C View Post
Todd, I have a suggestion for a section near the tail light, I have done a similar shape on a smaller scale in repairing the trunk in a Fairlane. You should be able to make that section by tipping the side flanges at 45's, performing the shrinks, and tipping the remainder. See pic 3 and 4 below in particular...
Robert
We need to talk in more detail. This is nearly identical to what i need to do.

Do you only use a shrinker/stretcher to achieve that replication of the drip rail?
In some of Lazee's videos i have watched, he used a tool that i don't know the name of. It looks like needle nose pliers with sharp points and fixed in place, not moveable. He would then put the sheetmetal in there and bend it in each direction to form a cone shape in the metal. Then he would shrink that little shaped area down. I think he did this to help him form the metal faster.
The deformation that then gets hit with the Shrinker is similar to below:
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Old 09-16-2014, 06:43 AM
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RatRockx RatRockx is offline
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Hi Todd. I think you mean tucking forks. They are used to create tucks that can be crushed into themselves, thus shrinking the edge of the material: http://allmetalshaping.com/showthrea...t=tucking+fork
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  #10  
Old 09-16-2014, 07:48 AM
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MP&C MP&C is offline
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Todd, For the size of the radius in the trunk opening, that machine should easily perform the needed shrinking function without also adding tucks. As Joris stated, those are formed using tucking forks, which is another method of shrinking. I'd say one of your goals should also be to keep distortion (waviness) to a minimum. It looks like the combination of shrinker jaw and tucks in your picture above adds to the distortion. I'd give it a go with the shrinker alone and observe the results, see which works best.
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Last edited by MP&C; 09-16-2014 at 07:52 AM.
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