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  #11  
Old 03-04-2021, 09:03 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Jaroslav, you are being an ass. Let's keep this post on metal shaping and building cool projects.

Respectful submitted.

Bill
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  #12  
Old 03-04-2021, 10:57 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Hi Greg,
I think, from what I see so far, this will be a good project for you.


Design wise :

The 550 has a folded sheetmetal inner structure, rather than a bunch of tubing/angle/channel metal components welded to the chassis that support the body panels.

Porsche used this cut /formed/riveted "shoebox" sheetmetal arrangement onto the welded-tube ladder-framed 550 and the later 718's - RSK, RS60, RS61 .... and parallel to the production of the unit body production cars - 356 A,B,C - and 901, 911, 912....


It might be easier for you to do the welded steel superstructure to carry your bodywork, rather than the sheetmetal box structure - but this is up to you, entirely.


(for straight line sheetmetal folds and bends you will have to be good with a hand shear and also have access to a sheetmetal "brake" for making straight bends.)


For curved flanged sheetmetal edges you can make curved cuts in plywood/MDF, clamp that together with the cut sheetmetal in twixt, and then hand hammer the 1/2in or 3/4 in flange over. Simple tools making interlocking curved body supports.


Otherwise, you can handsaw tubing and angle and torch weld it to the chassis and to each other. You can hot bend supports. And make sheetmetal little brackets to go from that light structure to the bodypanels.
(AKA: "superleggera" a patented Italian body- assembly/support process by Touring Carrozzeria, 1934.)


Oh - and welcome to the group.
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  #13  
Old 03-04-2021, 11:53 PM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTromblay View Post
Jaroslav, you are being an ass. Let's keep this post on metal shaping and building cool projects.

Respectful submitted.

Bill

Bill, Jaro uses a translator like Google and sometimes I believe things get lost in translation. Maybe your comment was a little harsh.

Kent, I like the idea of using plywood/MDF for turning over a curved flange. I will try that. Thank you.
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  #14  
Old 03-05-2021, 12:13 AM
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galderdi galderdi is offline
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Location: Brisbane Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
Bill, Jaro uses a translator like Google and sometimes I believe things get lost in translation. Maybe your comment was a little harsh.

Kent, I like the idea of using plywood/MDF for turning over a curved flange. I will try that. Thank you.
I'm not concerned about his words. I am concerned about the whole point of my project thread being lost in a quagmire of ramblings not even related to metal shaping. Being new to the forum I couldn't really see a way to set it straight so I have given up on this thread. I'll start another when I have some shaping to show. Hopefully that one won't become a huge debate of choice of driveline.
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  #15  
Old 03-05-2021, 12:22 AM
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galderdi galderdi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Hi Greg,
I think, from what I see so far, this will be a good project for you.


Design wise :

The 550 has a folded sheetmetal inner structure, rather than a bunch of tubing/angle/channel metal components welded to the chassis that support the body panels.

Porsche used this cut /formed/riveted "shoebox" sheetmetal arrangement onto the welded-tube ladder-framed 550 and the later 718's - RSK, RS60, RS61 .... and parallel to the production of the unit body production cars - 356 A,B,C - and 901, 911, 912....


It might be easier for you to do the welded steel superstructure to carry your bodywork, rather than the sheetmetal box structure - but this is up to you, entirely.


(for straight line sheetmetal folds and bends you will have to be good with a hand shear and also have access to a sheetmetal "brake" for making straight bends.)


For curved flanged sheetmetal edges you can make curved cuts in plywood/MDF, clamp that together with the cut sheetmetal in twixt, and then hand hammer the 1/2in or 3/4 in flange over. Simple tools making interlocking curved body supports.


Otherwise, you can handsaw tubing and angle and torch weld it to the chassis and to each other. You can hot bend supports. And make sheetmetal little brackets to go from that light structure to the bodypanels.
(AKA: "superleggera" a patented Italian body- assembly/support process by Touring Carrozzeria, 1934.)


Oh - and welcome to the group.
Thanks Kent. I will start a clean thread in a couple of months when I have some shaping to show. All your comments/suggestions make sense. I have already purchased a chassis which I pick up this weekend. It is tubular steel. I don't have any flexibility with the chassis as any modifications would trigger a new set of engineering tests adding an extra $5000 to the budget. But I am confident I can work with the existing design. So from there I just need to build a buck and work out how to attach/hang/support the panels off the chassis. The bottom edges won't be an issue as the floor will extend past the frame allowing me to bolt the floor to the bottom edge of the panels. The rest I will work out with time.
In addition to the methods you mentioned also have a tipping die which can do quite good flanges if care is applied. I am also part way through making another flange tool using bearings. I'm yet to see how useful that will be......I do see a lot of Plywood in my future
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  #16  
Old 03-05-2021, 02:40 AM
Jaroslav Jaroslav is online now
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I'm sorry Greg and the others for deviating all this from the topic. You are justifiably angry. It has nothing to do with shaping. I apologize to everyone. I got a little excited about the new technology that is destroying us in Europe a lot.
You don't have to start a new thread, everyone will understand. And I won't deal with cable propulsion. I should have the shared coil patented in time before anyone can figure it out.
I just only described the points I see. The truth is, someone has to start testing that technology in practice. I still believe that the car you use for a reliable range has a carburetor.


Furthermore, only sheet metal shaping.
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