All MetalShaping

Go Back   All MetalShaping > Metal Shaping Projects > Automotive Projects
  Today's Posts Posts for Last 7 Days Posts for Last 14 Days  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #131  
Old 11-09-2014, 04:49 AM
Gojeep's Avatar
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
MetalShaper of the Month March 2015, March 2020,, June 2022
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Eastern Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,811
Default


After many years of searching I have finally found a colour that I really like for the GrandWillys. It is Jeep Grand Cherokee colour to boot which ties in even better with donor. I was fortunate enough for the owner of this Jeep to give me this high resolution shot he took in Utah.


After looking at this photo I am wondering if I should continue the factory bead that goes along the edge of the cowl vertically until it meets the guard on the angle. I don't know if it is because I extended the sill that the part without the bead looks unfinished now? Maybe I should see if I can make a piece to continue the bead down to the sill?


I felt that the gap along the edge between where the stock bead and the new sill ended, looked unfinished. The area was also a bit thin from where the rust had been on the inside.


So I cut the area out and extended the bead to meet the sill. Blends in a bit more now. I have also been working on improving the door gap as it varied a lot, especially nearer the top where the door must have over swung and compressed the edge away on the cowl.


The original sill was welded back on again after repairs and matched in well with the new section at the bottom of the cowl.


The louvers are still just sitting there as I will have to make ducting behind it to feed the A/C intake once it is attached to the donor firewall.


This will be my last name pressing I swear! Got this Overland pressing from the US from a 1913 Willys Overland Tourer. Supposed have been part of the running board but can't find any pictures showing it? It is made from 2mm/14g steel the same as the bed will be made from, so thinking the best spot might be the front header panel. Can't think of anywhere else as the tailgate already has a WO pressing in it stock.


After a few years of searching I came across a local rear drive shaft from a 6.1 SRT version of the donor Grand Cherokee. They run a different transmission and transfercase and run a longer drive shaft as a result. Works out that I can use it to take up the difference in the wheelbase in mine.

[
It is in excellent condition and had only done 72,000km/44,000 miles so has plenty of life in it. I spent an hour or so prepping the cast steel ends for paint. Should be able to sell my shaft off to offset the cost as has only 36,000km/22,000 miles on it. These will be in demand as you cannot change the unis on them as staked in place.


Bolted it in a fitted perfectly. Was actually nearly an inch longer than I needed but there was plenty of compression in the slip yoke to take up the extra and then plenty still left for suspension movement. The driveshaft is alloy and nearly 4" in diameter.


Ok, need an opinion please. I was originally going to add the louver for the A/C intake in this position but have been asked why not centre it on the side of the cowl. It works out better for ducting inside the cowl position here and is fairly centre to the flat part of the upper cowl.


This is what it looks like being centered on the side of the cowl. Can actually see the opposite side of the cowl on the trestles with it in the forward position too.


With it forward. the distance from the bead on the edge of the cowl to the louver is also the same as the width on the leading edge of the door profile also.


Another view with it centered.
Which do you prefer forward, centered or either way?
__________________
Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 01:45 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #132  
Old 11-09-2014, 11:39 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
MetalShaper of the Month October '14 , April '16, July 2020, Jan 2023
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Western Sierra Nevadas, Badger Hill, CA
Posts: 4,269
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gojeep View Post
Glad to hear it Dave.


I felt that the gap along the edge between where the stock bead and the new sill ended, looked unfinished. The area was also a bit thin from where the rust had been on the inside.


So I cut the area out and extended the bead to meet the sill. Blends in a bit more now. I have also been working on improving the door gap as it varied a lot, especially nearer the top where the door must have over swung and compressed the edge away on the cowl.


The original sill was welded back on again after repairs and matched in well with the new section at the bottom of the cowl.


The louvers are still just sitting there as I will have to make ducting behind it to feed the A/C intake once it is attached to the donor firewall.


On to the other side of the cowl. Some of the things I had to do differently was shorten this side by 5mm-3/16" to get it the same as the other side in overall height. I remembered the difference showing up when I checked it with a laser before cutting it apart. Measurement showed it was at the cowl seam so cut the extra out there before welding it up. You will also notice that the fold along the door edge has been straightened back out too. The cowl was narrower here by 2mm, affecting the door gap.


The very last part of the fold curved for the start of the A pillar angle. So it could not be folded along a straight edge. I just used vice grips to slowly bend it over with the slight curve at the top.


Can just make out the slight curve now. If I had not put it in, the A pillar would not have lined up correctly and would have increased the door gap too. It was only an extra 2mm different, but as the rest of the door gap is 4mm, it would have been 50% more.


One thing that is quicker was that the angle of the door sill to cowl had already been all worked out on the other side. So I used that to get it the same for this side.


So to wrap up. The door sill profile has been extended right across the bottom of the cowl. The Willys pressing added and the bead running along the forward edge continues now to the bottom. Cowl seam has been welded up and cut away flush from the back. Rust repairs, including replacing nearly the whole bottom 12" as well as part of the door sill done. Holes filled and dents removed. The door sills have also been adjusted to follow the curvature of the doors exactly. The whole bottom half of the cab, back wall included, does not have a single original spot weld left!
Nice clean layout and organization on this project. Comparing sides is a proven technique for making them match, all the way along. Very good to see the attention to detail, accuracy, and using the related parts to confirm geometry. The end result will be a very clean and even radical Willys. Really good to see these efforts.
__________________
Kent

http://www.tinmantech.com

"All it takes is a little practical experience to blow the he!! out of a perfectly good theory." --- Lloyd Rosenquist, charter member AWS, 1919.
Reply With Quote
  #133  
Old 11-09-2014, 06:58 PM
Gojeep's Avatar
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
MetalShaper of the Month March 2015, March 2020,, June 2022
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Eastern Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,811
Default

I might not have time to work on the project at the moment, but doesn't stop me thinking about things I need to sort out.
I had wheels picked out but have since found out that I'm not allowed to run them for the tyre size I have chosen. So now deciding on which ones to choose. They have to be a 17" wheel to clear the brakes and have a 7 or 7.5" width to suit the 235/80R17 tyres I want to run. The offset also needs to be at least +25, or 5" of back spacing, and have a 5 on 5", or 127mm, stud pattern. Want a more traditional look too and not modern.


These are the front runners right now as remind me a bit of the Willys Combat rims with the bolts around the outside.


This is the Combat rim showing the bolts around the outside so the two halves of the rim could be easily separated for tyre changes in the field.


I wanted to run the Centerline Smoothies to start with but cannot not get enough backspacing in the 17x7" wheel. So maybe something like these with a Willys centre cap?


These come in a couple of different hole shapes too.


Not sure if I like the covered nuts as might look too modern?


This maybe too plain?
__________________
Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 01:48 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #134  
Old 11-10-2014, 06:30 PM
Gojeep's Avatar
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
MetalShaper of the Month March 2015, March 2020,, June 2022
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Eastern Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,811
Default

Caught up on the house renovations for the moment and most other things as well so can't wait to get back into the build. Have been working on a few tools when I had a bit of spare time now and again and thought I would show some finished so far.


Nearly 20 years ago I was noodling for opals in a very remote field in the Outback and came across this, then new, bulldozer ripping tooth buried in a mullock heap. It is a big heavy thing and thought it would come in handy one day. Cleaned it up and have welded a stem on to it to use as a stake dolly.


The underside has some useful shapes to it as well as the sides. Just the head is 250mm/10" long and weighs 16kg/35lbs. Going to make a bracket so it can be fasten to the side of my welding table, or be used in one of my bench vices or the portable one shown here.


Been looking for a few years for a high crown hammer to use in the back of curved metal as well. Couldn't find one so made this one up from an old English forged head I picked up at a swap meet in Ballarat this year. It had flat round heads and added to it until they were square and shaped the high crown on.


This end is shaped perpendicular to the other as often can't hit in the same direction.


Built my own bullseye pick. Thought they were a lot of money but cheap to make yourself.


Total cost was only $9 for a couple of meters of solid 12mm-1/2" rod. Every thing else I had. I made both a pointed and blunt tips for it that I made from 16mm-5/8" solid rod that I drilled and threaded.


Gives you very accurate strikes and used often where swinging a hammer from underneath is awkward.


Painted up ready for use.




Works in a off dolly method so won't stretch the metal like directly on dolly. Great for lifting small dents etc in the finishing stage when going for a smooth metal finish.


Made this dolly from an old rusty block of steel that didn't have a single straight or smooth face. I made the curve to match part of the Willys body that I didn't have a matching dolly for.


Well I made the mistake of buying a cheap English Wheel off eBay. It was so badly put together that I could not even thread the adjuster in that screws up from the bottom due to the bush being welded on such a angle as shown!


Even the lower anvil mount was welded in crooked as should be perfectly parallel with the upper wheel to function correctly. All materials were also very thin walled. I even had to beat on the upper wheel bracket just to fit it in as well.


The lower anvil wheels were also tiny and some useless due to excessive radius. Lodged a dispute with Paypal and up for the cost for freight for returning it. Just not worth even spending the time fixing it. Will have to pony up for a decent one by the looks of it, just to get one that functions.
Good tools only hurt your pocket once, cheap bad tools each time you use them!


Ended up buying a much better english wheel which I hope will help me when comes to doing my custom roof panel etc.
__________________
Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 02:03 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #135  
Old 11-11-2014, 02:23 AM
axelkloehn axelkloehn is offline
MetalShaper of the Month June '15
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Hamburg/Germany
Posts: 198
Default

Nice tools, Marcus! Very inspiring, I have got to make some for me too!
__________________
Axel Kloehn
Reply With Quote
  #136  
Old 11-11-2014, 03:27 AM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Nov. 2018, Jan. 2021
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 860
Default

Very nice Marcus. Inspirational. I must get some beer and go and see one of the local forklift crowds. Gather that bits of fork tines make good dollies. Understand that once tines get a certain amount of wear on the heel, they won't pass certification and get scrapped.
__________________
Richard
"I know nothing. I from Barcelona" (Manuel - Fawlty Towers)
Link to our racecar project https://www.facebook.com/pages/Elan-...ab=public&view
Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 11-11-2014, 11:35 AM
nonhog's Avatar
nonhog nonhog is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Puyallup Wa.
Posts: 282
Default

Re: wheel choice, an alloy wheel painted to match the look of factory then adding a factory wheel cap would set it off.
Using clips like these.... http://www.tuckersparts.com/Hub-Cap-Clips.html


Just a thought.
Love the pick you made!
__________________
Brad
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 11-11-2014, 05:50 PM
Gojeep's Avatar
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
MetalShaper of the Month March 2015, March 2020,, June 2022
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Eastern Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,811
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nonhog View Post
Re: wheel choice, an alloy wheel painted to match the look of factory then adding a factory wheel cap would set it off.
Using clips like these.... http://www.tuckersparts.com/Hub-Cap-Clips.html


Just a thought.
Love the pick you made!
Leaning that way for sure. Don't want the wheels to be the focal point, but not detract either.
__________________
Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 11-11-2014, 05:57 PM
Gojeep's Avatar
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
MetalShaper of the Month March 2015, March 2020,, June 2022
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Eastern Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,811
Default


Haven't shown much from doing this side of the cowl as not much different to the other side. Some of the things I had to do differently was shorten this side by 5mm-3/16" to get it the same as the other side in overall height. I remembered the difference showing up when I checked it with a laser before cutting it apart. Measurement showed it was at the cowl seam so cut the extra out there before welding it up. You will also notice that the fold along the door edge has been straightened back out too. The cowl was narrower here by 2mm, affecting the door gap.


The very last part of the fold curved for the start of the A pillar angle. So it could not be folded along a straight edge. I just used vice grips to slowly bend it over with the slight curve at the top.


Can just make out the slight curve now. If I had not put it in, the A pillar would not have lined up correctly and would have increased the door gap too. It was only an extra 2mm different, but as the rest of the door gap is 4mm, it would have been 50% more.


One thing that is quicker was that the angle of the door sill to cowl had already been all worked out on the other side. So I used that to get it the same for this side.


So to wrap up. The door sill profile has been extended right across the bottom of the cowl. The Willys pressing added and the bead running along the forward edge continues now to the bottom. Cowl seam has been welded up and cut away flush from the back. Rust repairs, including replacing nearly the whole bottom 12" as well as part of the door sill done. Holes filled and dents removed. The door sills have also been adjusted to follow the curvature of the doors exactly. The whole bottom half of the cab, back wall included, does not have a single original spot weld left!


New TIG welder! Been hanging out for a year to get it and got it for a great price in the end of financial year sales. Stayed with the Uni-Mig brand as had double the warranty with local backup and service. My Mig under it is still going strong and would be around 7 years old now with lots of hard use. It is an inverter AC/DC 200 amp machine with analogue controls, as prefer them to digital. More reliable and can see at a glance what you settings are without going through menus.


Going to make a wider rack at the back to hold two bottles so I can make this my welding station. Less floor space this way and either process always ready. Now just got to learn how to use the tig! Been doing much reading and already know what each of the knobs do and watched many a youtube video. Will see how it goes. Hopefully get some advice along the way to sort out any problems. Love learning new skills and that is why I took on this build.


Also made a couple of mounts for stake dolly I made from a ripping tooth on my weld table. Can be mounted 90* to this as well.


The tig has been mounted now on supports above the mig. It is made that I can still lift off the side cover to change wire rolls without removing the tig.


I folded up a draw for under the tig from an old barbeque lid that someone had thrown away. Even used the handle off it.


The back twin bottle support has been made into a tray for more storage. Another tray was folded up on a raised platform to clear the wheels at the bottom. All also came from the same barbeque lid! Old choker chain holds the bottles in place.


Made a hook to hold the welding helmet. Also notice extra old mig reel cut in half and added to store the mig cables etc on one side, and the tig ones on the other.


For filler wire while tig welding the panel steel, I am using 0.9 mm mig wire. Only problem is it is always curled. Here is a trick I learnt to straighten it. Clamp one end in a vice, put a drill tightly at the other end. Keep tension by pulling back on the drill and give the trigger a squeeze for a second. Keep the wire straight while undoing the chuck and you will have straight wire! You can emery paper the copper coating off before undoing the chuck if you like. I used it with the copper on too and seems to work as well.


So fired up the tig for the first time and started practising with the filler wire as well. Been fun learning a new welding process for the first time in 30 years! These are all my attempts so far and the bottom most weld was my first attempt at a join between the two pieces. This is all on scrap cut from the body of the Willys, as thought it was the best way to learn.
__________________
Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 02:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 11-11-2014, 06:26 PM
nonhog's Avatar
nonhog nonhog is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Puyallup Wa.
Posts: 282
Default

That little wheels looks a lot like my Grizzly wheel. Spend forever bushing the upper wheel to remove slop. Still not done fixing it. Adj. pretty sloppy also.
It did knock down the walnuts well on a test piece.
__________________
Brad
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.